Declassification and valorization of char materials from biofuels production

This research project is focused on char, a carbon compound which is similar to activated carbon found in water filters such as Brita. This char is produced as a by-product of a municipal waste treatment processes. The char currently produced has high levels of naphthalene, the volatile organic compound used as the principal ingredient in mothballs. Naphthalene is slow to break down, and thus we want to limit its leaching into soils and waterways. One method to do this, is to combine it with cement to prevent water from contacting the material.

Monitoring the Health of Vancouver’s Waterfront Over Time Using Indicators of Sustainability

Georgia Strait Alliance is seeking to undertake the creation of a framework and baseline analysis of indicators that reflect the current health and resilience of City of Vancouver’s waterfront over a broad cross-section of themes in order to further the objectives of their Waterfront Initiative (WI) project. Urban waterfronts globally are complex with multiple governing authorities, overlapping jurisdictions, and varying interests, all of which lead to a high degree of land-use conflict.

Exploring livelihood change in upland rural Hmong villages in Maguan County, Yunnan, China

My Master’s thesis will investigate how ethnic minority livelihoods, specifically those of ethnic minority Hmong (Miao) , have changed in rural Southwestern China over the last 20 years. Hmong communities have traditionally made their livelihoods around household based semi-subsistence agricultural production, based primarily on rice or maize. However, new state policies, technologies, and opportunities are changing the means by which Hmong individuals and households are making ends meet.

Review of Effectiveness of Investments in Renewable Energy for Social and Affordable Housing

This research will identify best practices for the design of renewable energy investment programs targeting the social housing sector. Involving mixed methods of research, including literature review, interjurisdictional scan, and strategic interviews with third party experts, the research will result in a set of actionable recommendations for provincial and federal governments, municipal social housing authorities, and other third party private sector actors involved in the renewable energy and social housing sectors.

Geologically-constrained geophysical inversions of a kimberlite pipe: A new approach to diamond exploration

Diamond-bearing kimberlites are enigmatic deposits due to their complex volcanic plumbing systems and variable preservation. Diamond concentrations will vary greatly with deposit-type, however, it is often difficult to effectively distinguish between types (without drilling) due to alteration or poor preservation. Furthermore, while geophysical methods are well established and effective techniques for kimberlite exploration, they require independent and costly constraints (e.g., drill hole data) to limit the number of geologically plausible targets.

Monitoring the genetic health and structure of Grizzly bear populations in British Columbia to inform ecotourism and resource management

Grizzly bears represent a valuable economic, ecological, cultural and symbolic resource for British Columbia. In order to preserve this resource the current population of brown bears needs to be monitored to ensure the health of the population. One marker of health is the genetic health of the population. Genetic monitoring can also tell us important information about how related different bear populations are and how well these populations are adapted to their ecosystem.

Optimizing Numerical Weather Prediction for Clean Energy

Modern weather forecasts are made by computers that solve the complicated equations for air motion, heat, and moisture. Different computer codes, called weather models, use different atmospheric approximations, creating slightly different forecasts. This forecast diversity is good, because the average of all forecasts is often the most accurate, and the spread between forecasts measures uncertainty.

Sustainable Capacity Building in the North by the North

This unique research project, undertaken by Master of Northern Governance and Development (MNGD) students, contributes significantly to our understanding of the North. The research focuses on community-based responses to rapid economic, social, and environmental changes and the development of the local capacity to respond. The analysis is collaborative, involving key stakeholders at the community and multi-community levels, and is informed by their values and interests.

Pool-riffle design for river restora

Professionally practicing Civil Engineers and Earth Scientists engage in stream restoration actions in order to enhance freshwater habitats for salmon, trout, and a variety of other species. There is a wealth of procedures and standards available to help practitioners develop design plans. However, there is a lack of specific guidelines to help identify stream reconstruction details that will give the overall effort a greater likelihood of meeting performance expectations and criteria after the project has been constructed.

Synchronicity between phytoplankton and zooplankton phenology in the Salish Sea

The Salish Sea is a highly productive, dynamic coastal ocean with substantial temporal and spatial variability at lower trophic levels (e.g. phytoplankton and zooplankton). This variability, in turn, may directly impact resident and migratory fish populations that are of major economic importance in the region. The main goal of this research is to investigate the level of synchronicity between phytoplankton and zooplankton phenology in the Salish Sea.

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