High-tech headphones silence hearing loss on the worksite

To help overcome the increasing risk of hearing loss suffered by construction workers, EERS, a Quebec-based start-up, is developing technology to address this common industrial worksite complaint.

Seeding frenzy

A few years later, that opportunity has allowed Joel to build a career for himself, and make developments that have benefitted the company and Canada’s agricultural sector.

“It was hardcore research,” says Joel, looking back on his internship. “Not just gathering data, but also looking at the results, drawing conclusions, and making recommendations directly to the general manager. It was more like a project as a professional than as an intern, and it definitely gave me a foot in the door.” Joel’s internship also led to the company filing a patent on some of his work.

SFU lab and Chilliwack company are buzzing with tech advances

To help tackle this environmental issue, Mitacs intern Oldooz Pooyanfar, a graduate student from Simon Fraser University’s School of Mechatronic Systems Engineering, is working on a ‘smart’ system that monitors the health of honey bees and their hives. Once installed inside a beehive, her integrated monitoring system allows beekeepers to observe and track the health of their colonies. The device uses microscopic sensors and microphones to pick up sounds and vibrations emitted by bees and can also be used to observe the temperature and humidity of each hive.

Finding the bigger picture in microscopic algae

After hearing about Mitacs’ Globalink Research Internships through her department head, she set her sights on Canada and submitted her application.

Hayfa’s interest in research abroad soon found her in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, where she’s studying algae in order to learn more about the health of the province’s lakes and rivers. Her research project, based at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières (UQTR), uses a new mathematical approach to evaluating the microscopic organisms in fresh and salt water.

Ensuring seismic safety, one beam at a time

Tao is helping develop a structural system that will mitigate hazards in industrial buildings — often containing heavy equipment — during an earthquake.

Tao’s first task involves looking at blueprints of industrial buildings, specifically ones that store overhead cranes, to better understand their design and seismic behaviour. This is a significant step because overhead cranes can change the way a building moves and reacts to an earthquake.

Self-driving wheelchair rolls out at University of Toronto

Working under the direction of Professor Jonathan Kelly, Xinyi is helping to extend leading-edge technology that makes it possible for the wheelchair to navigate and drive itself.

No humming and hawing here: Australian researcher tracking mysterious sound in Calgary

The Aussie is researching a strange phenomenon dubbed ‘The Ranchlands Hum’— a mysterious noise that has plagued residents in the northwest Calgary community of Ranchlands since 2008.

Blown away: Brazilian intern takes her research to Saskatchewan wind farms

Luanna’s in Canada as a Mitacs Globalink intern where she’s collaborating with Professor Wei Peng on a project to make wind power more efficient.

“Ever since I was a teenager, I’ve had a love for renewable energy,” says Luanna. “When I read about this project, I jumped at the chance to take part in it and further my knowledge.”

Disease diagnosis and prosthetic limbs to benefit from muscle research

Gabriel and Dr Kuruganti are using high-density electromyography (EMG) sensors to understand how the muscles in the upper and lower limbs behave under different conditions including exercise and rehabilitation. The information obtained from these sensors can help to understand human movement. Traditionally, EMG systems use up to 16 channels of data. Gabriel is helping to “tune” the high-density EMG signals in a 64-node sensor to give the highest quality information for other researchers to use.

Flooding simulation software to help Canadians keep their heads above water

One Tunisian student is focusing on the Spencer Creek watershed in Dundas, Ontario (near Hamilton), in the hopes of understanding — and preventing — floods in the area and across Canada. Houssem Hmaidi is an engineering undergraduate at the University of Medjez El Bab who is spending his summer at the University of Guelph through Mitacs’ Globalink program. Under the supervision of Dr. Andrew Binns, he’s working on a 2-D modelling project that simulates real and staged flooding events in the region, using software developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

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