Quantifying the value added by the first large ensemble of high-resolution climate-change simulations over Québec

Regional Climate Models (RCMs) allow generating climate-change projections into the future over a limited region of the globe at high spatial resolution. The production of large ensembles of simulations from a same RCM is an emerging field of research allowing to explore in detail the interaction between climate change, natural climate variability and extreme events, at the local scale where climate impacts occur.

Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Laurentian Great Lakes Water Supply using Regional Climate Models

Several studies have shown that water levels of the Great Lakes would inevitably decline in a warmer climate. These studies were based on a modeling system that was not accounting for two-way exchanges of water and energy between the atmosphere and the earth surface, hence excluding key feedback mechanisms. The general objective of this project is to improve our understanding of the Great Lakes water resources and its sensitivity to climate change.

Assessing the risk of abrupt climate changes resulting from cumulative emissions and their effect on the occurrence of extreme events

Human influence on current climate change is now unequivocal. The rate of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions continues to increase, and climate models and observations show that climate changes are accelerating in response to these emissions. In this context, the rate of the current climate change strongly modifies the frequency and the intensity of extreme events, such as droughts, heat waves or extreme precipitation. Strong rates of GHG emissions can cause a destabilization of a component of the climate system (e.g.