Sounding the right alarm in a noisy ICU

Now, a research team at the École de technologie supérieure is developing a technology-based solution to help nurses and doctors distinguish important signals in the ICU: a ‘smart’ earplug for hospital care practitioners. This summer, they’ve engaged an international research intern — through a Mitacs Globalink internship — to help bring the technology one step closer to a care unit near you.

Digital insole helps visually impaired wearers take a step forward to the future

A research team at the Université du Québec à Chicoutimi has asked just that, and are developing a ‘smart’ insole for shoes that will be able to provide navigational feedback — such as a pulse or vibration — to the wearer. Having already built a prototype, this summer they’ve engaged an international research intern for her insight into smart fabrics that could bring it one step closer to reality.  

Cancer patients receive easy access to treatment information

This summer, Mitacs Globalink intern Anton Gladyr, an undergraduate student from Ukraine, is working under the guidance of Professor John Kildea to expand the app’s functionality. Anton is developing a user-friendly interface that will collect data from patients as they undergo treatment.

A meeting of the minds meets the challenges of deadly disease

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) — responsible for safeguarding the health of people, animals, and plants in our country — recognizes that scientists do a much better job of identifying and dealing with biological threats if they work together.

Finding the bigger picture in microscopic algae

After hearing about Mitacs’ Globalink Research Internships through her department head, she set her sights on Canada and submitted her application.

Hayfa’s interest in research abroad soon found her in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, where she’s studying algae in order to learn more about the health of the province’s lakes and rivers. Her research project, based at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières (UQTR), uses a new mathematical approach to evaluating the microscopic organisms in fresh and salt water.

Ryerson intern clears the air in Toronto

Florian Mayer, a Mitacs Globalink intern who spent his summer at Ryerson University in Toronto, wants to figure out how cities and roads can be built to reduce traffic, while working to improve long-term health outcomes in the world’s busiest cities. Researching alongside Associate Professor Leila Farah, Florian examined how the urban environment affects public health and how planners can work with communities to improve it on a local level. 

Drone research takes flight for visiting student

But regardless of drones’ ultimate applications, researchers are still trying to determine how to effectively operate more than one at a time.

Pregnancy and malaria, a deadly combination

Working under the direction of University of Alberta Professor Stephanie Yanow and PhD student Catherine Mitran, Ina is looking at samples from pregnant women in several regions in South America who have been infected with a type of malaria parasite called Plasmodium vivax. She’s then exploring the cross-reaction of those samples to that of pregnant women who’ve been infected by a different malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, to see if the first species can create antibodies that contribute to protection against the second species.

Ensuring seismic safety, one beam at a time

Tao is helping develop a structural system that will mitigate hazards in industrial buildings — often containing heavy equipment — during an earthquake.

Tao’s first task involves looking at blueprints of industrial buildings, specifically ones that store overhead cranes, to better understand their design and seismic behaviour. This is a significant step because overhead cranes can change the way a building moves and reacts to an earthquake.

Self-driving wheelchair rolls out at University of Toronto

Working under the direction of Professor Jonathan Kelly, Xinyi is helping to extend leading-edge technology that makes it possible for the wheelchair to navigate and drive itself.

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