Seeding frenzy

A few years later, that opportunity has allowed Joel to build a career for himself, and make developments that have benefitted the company and Canada’s agricultural sector.

“It was hardcore research,” says Joel, looking back on his internship. “Not just gathering data, but also looking at the results, drawing conclusions, and making recommendations directly to the general manager. It was more like a project as a professional than as an intern, and it definitely gave me a foot in the door.” Joel’s internship also led to the company filing a patent on some of his work.

Sweeter dreams are on the horizon thanks to a Halifax researcher and entrepreneur

With the help of his Dalhousie Accelerate supervisors, Professor David Roach from the Rowe School of Business, and Professor Jan Haelssig from the Faculty of Engineering, Hamed has started a company to develop technology that will make continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy more comfortable for patients.

Ontario start-up engages employees with video games

Ontario organizational development consulting firm ODScore asked just that. Except that instead of using actual video games to engage their clients’ employees, they use the principles that make video games engrossing to engage employees at work.

So when they wanted to develop a new service to tackle bigger organizational changes, ODScore turned to the University of Waterloo’s Games Institute for renewed expertise.

At a meeting with Professor Neil Randall, the company learned that what they thought was a technical challenge, was really one of human relations.

'Scan-to-skate' technology brings customized comfort to the ice

A new research project between Anne-Laure Ménard, a postdoctoral fellow based at Laboratoire d’Imagerie Orthopédique (LIO) at Hopital du Sacré-Coeur in Montreal, and sports equipment company CCM Hockey is integrating biomedical engineering and skate design to provide customized hockey skates. The project began when Anne-Laure started looking into industry opportunities as she was nearing the end of her PhD at Polytechnique Montréal. “I reached out to a professor at École de téchnologie supérieure who happened to be in contact with CCM Hockey,” she explains.

Cracking the genetic code of high performance athletes

As a former varsity athlete and PhD scholar in biochemistry and molecular biology, Jeremy has always balanced a passion for sport with his profession as a genetics researcher. The idea of combining the two into a company began to take shape during a Mitacs Accelerate internship.

Gaining skills for the present, making connections for the future

But UBC PhD student Samuel Antoine says this is exactly the kind of big-picture thinking that academics need to succeed. Thanks to Mitacs Step, Sam has been able to access a wide range of similar courses that will help his career.

It started when Sam was talking with his academic supervisor in UBC’s School of Population and Public Health about opportunities to continue his research.

Where are they now? Student turns her internship into a rewarding career

“I was deciding between two graduate programs: one included an internship, the other didn't. But my future supervisor informed me that it was still possible through Mitacs Accelerate. That sealed the deal for me: with Mitacs in the picture, I would be able to do exactly what I wanted—stay in Toronto, do research in computational aerodynamics at the University of Toronto's Institute for Aerospace Studies under the supervision of Dr. David W. Zingg, and finish my program with an internship.”

Where are they now? Former Accelerate intern spreads the word about Mitacs

During Juan’s postdoc, he undertook four Mitacs Accelerate internships with FORRx Consulting Inc., a Vancouver-based firm specializing in ecosystem modeling. Juan credits his Accelerate experience with giving him a significant professional jumpstart:

“The funding was key to developing my academic career, my relationships, and my understanding of the use and transfer of my research for real-life and business situations.”

Putting graduate research into practice

Luckily, with the help of Mitacs — a national not-for-profit organization that designs and delivers research and training programs for Canadian academics — Concordia students are being given the chance to do just this.

Postcard from Turkey: Ryerson graduate student proposes a model for environmental sustainability in ICT

I am a PhD candidate in the Environmental Applied Science and Management program at Ryerson University. I am interested in approaches that will help software developers design products that meet customers' needs, require less energy to produce, are longer lasting, and can be safely and responsibly disposed. I am studying the interrelationships between product quality and sustainability and I’m enthusiastic about finding and removing their boundaries so that software developers aren't afraid to be more sustainable.

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