Integrating hydrological process science into watershed management for the Upper Athabasca

Water use, land use and climate change can alter hydrology and effect the downstream availably of water and timing of flows. The Athabasca River is vital for supply of oil sands energy development and in-stream aquatic habitats. Much of the water for the river originates in the Mountain and Foothills Regions, in the Upper Athabasca. The Foothills Region is busy landscape with, forestry, natural forest disturbance, and upstream oil and gas developments. WaterSMART is developing a multi-stakeholder project in hopes to inform decision making.

Drone research takes flight for visiting student

But regardless of drones’ ultimate applications, researchers are still trying to determine how to effectively operate more than one at a time.

Diagnostic screening for conscious awareness in brain injury and disease: Visual component

Since the mid 1970s, medical personnel have used the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) as an important tool to rate and describe levels of consciousness. This scale is rudimentary and subjective, often resulting in misdiagnoses in cases where people lack the capacity to communicate. In some unfortunate situations, severe neurological damage can render people unable to move. Inevitably, these people are deemed vegetative when in actuality; many are simply ‘locked in’. For years researchers have used cognitive event related potentials (ERPs) with modified EEG to assess receptive language capacity.

DEVELOPMENT OF A PROCESS MODEL AND ENGINEERING DESIGN FOR NEXEN’S PARTIAL UPGRADING TECHNOLOGY

Production of bitumen in Canada has increased considerably in the last decade. Due to its heavy nature, bitumen needs upgrading in order to make it marketable. The first approach adopted was to fully upgrade it to high quality synthetic crude oil, but due to the enormous capital and operating costs, it has been proven that it was not the most economically suitable approach. Partial upgrading, where bitumen is upgraded into a transportable oil that meets pipeline specifications, has the potential to maximize the benefits of bitumen commercialization.

Building Prosperity / Building Communities: exploring the value of landscape level approaches to heritage and diversity

How can cities positively make use of their heritage in ways which support future their prosperity and quality of life? This is the question at the heart of a research collaboration between the City-Region Studies Centre (CRSC), at the University of Alberta, and the Edmonton Heritage Council (EHC). Edmonton is experiencing a period of rapid growth and development, transforming the city into a modern metropolitan centre.

Predator Reduction and Habitat Influences: Impacts on Upland Duck Nest Success in Alberta Parklands

More than any other life stage, the hatching of eggs is the most important factor in the maintenance of dabbling duck populations. Rates of nest success are suppressed by predators like foxes, coyotes, skunks, and crows. Populations of these predators can be artificially high due to habitat alterations resulting from human development. The Delta Waterfowl Foundation proposes lethal trapping to reduce nest predation in Alberta parkland habitats. However, predator reduction programs can direct limited resources away from habitat-based alternatives, and are controversial.

New statistical machine learning methods applied to high dimensional sensory input data from chemistry

Machine learning is the concept where a computer can be trained to recognize data and predict future outcomes based on the trends that exist in the data. This method of analysis has not been used on engine data, specifically in-line oil. Oil is an engine’s lifeblood and a lot of data can be collected and engine health can be predicted based on these measurements. This project aims to deploy machine learning concepts in the area of engine failure prediction. A special sensor equipped with the machine learning algorithm will be able to report all vital signs of an engine in a matter of minutes.

Towards an operational database of forest bird abundance in British Columbia

Forest companies would like to reduce the number of birds, eggs, and nests that are negatively affected by logging. The problem is that we don’t have detailed knowledge of where every bird lives, so it’s difficult to make educated choices about where and how much forest to harvest. My research will provide a solution to this problem. I will relate bird data to forest characteristics like age and height to understand which forest types have the most birds, and to map out where birds are most likely to live.

Aircraft Piston Engine Detonation Measurements and Data Analysis

Aircraft piston engines are widely used for aviation in North America and still use leaded fuel. 100 octane low-lead (100LL) aviation gasoline (avgas) is the common fuel used in aviation that contains lead in the form of Tetra-ethyl Lead (TEL). The TEL additive is mainly used to modulate the aviation gasoline octane levels to avoid knock and engine failure. This lead additive is harmful for the environment and it has been phased out in the automotive industry in the 1970-1980’s and completely phased out in 1993 in Canada and 1996 in the United States.

Pregnancy and malaria, a deadly combination

Working under the direction of University of Alberta Professor Stephanie Yanow and PhD student Catherine Mitran, Ina is looking at samples from pregnant women in several regions in South America who have been infected with a type of malaria parasite called Plasmodium vivax. She’s then exploring the cross-reaction of those samples to that of pregnant women who’ve been infected by a different malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, to see if the first species can create antibodies that contribute to protection against the second species.

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