Management of group-housed sows: optimizing mixing time and environmental enrichment to improve welfare and productivity

Pork producers in Canada are in the process of transitioning from stall housing to group housing systems for gestating sows. The greatest concern with this change is the problem of aggression when pregnant sows are mixed. Mixing frequently results in aggressive interactions among sows, and can affect reproduction and cause welfare problems. Typically sows are held in stalls for several weeks after insemination to minimize stress during embryo implantation, however there is increasing pressure to reduce the time that sows are kept in stalls.

Development of predictive erosion-corrosion models for potash slurry flow

Electrochemical corrosion is the most common source of plant downtime in the Chemical Processing Industries (CPI); in the Province of Saskatchewan, the Mining Industry plays a very significant role in CPI. Mineral processing plants handle electrolytic and abrasive materials that can cause very significant structural damage due to electrochemical corrosion and wear.

In-Seam Electromagnetics to Identify Anomalous Near Mine Brine-FilledGeological Layers

One of the major issues facing potash mining in Saskatchewan is the potential for water to enter
the mine from water-bearing rocks above mining operations. Rocks near-mine are normally
considered dry and low risk. However, under some conditions, in localized areas, there is the
potential for unsaturated water to have been introduced into the rock formations near the potash
ore.

Effects of Geomechanical Heterogeneity on Wormhole Development during Cold Heavy Oil Production – Phase 1

Canada possesses vast resources of heavy oil, which is oil that is too thick to flow through porous sandstone reservoirs and into production wells at economic rates when conventional operating practices are used. Since the mid 1980’s, heavy oil operators have demonstrated their ability to increase heavy oil production rates by encouraging the creation of porous and permeable zones (“wormholes”) within their reservoirs by allowing sand grains to detach from the reservoir rock and flow into the well (along with the oil).

Grazing patterns of bison vs. cattle in response to management strategies designed to improve habitat for Species at Risk

It is well established that livestock producers are effective land stewards and contribute to high productivity and wildlife habitat on grazed lands. The effectiveness of many management practices are established, but uncertainty remains, particularly in interactions between practices at large-scales. We propose to track grazing patterns of bison and cattle using GPS collars at the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s (NCC) Old Man on His Back Conservation Area (OMB) in response to various strategies (e.g. burning, fencing, weed control) over 3 years at multiple scales of observation (e.g.

Tracking the effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on migratory birds

Declines in migratory bird populations have been linked to a range of complex environmental factors, including the dramatic increase in application of neurotoxic neonicotinoid insecticides in recent decades. Neonicotinoids are used as seed treatments in a wide variety of Canadian crops, and consumption of treated seeds could result in poor navigation and migration delays in migratory birds. However, the influence of insecticides on cognition and patterns of movement is poorly understood.

Identifying potential approaches to managing water resources in Champagne and Aishihik First Nations’ Traditional Territory, Yukon

Yukon Energy Corporation (YEC) began generating hydro-electricity at the Aishihik Hydro Facility, situated within Champagne and Aishihik First Nations’ (CAFN) Traditional Territory, Yukon, in 1975. Their continuing water use license will expire in 2019. Notwithstanding the Aishihik facility’s 41 years of energy production, CAFN has repeatedly expressed social and environmental concerns associated with the facility's operation.

An Engaged Community for Shared Learning: Internships Contribute to Capacity Building in Northern Saskatchewan

The International Centre for Northern Governance and Development (ICNGD) was created to help focus attention on opportunities for building capacity in northern Saskatchewan. An overarching goal was to establish local to global relationships with the Circumpolar North in support of education, research and economic prosperity. The university, industry and northern communities work together to help students learn in an environment that is context based, relevant education and research in support of the north.

Identifying transportation mode based on smartphone sensor data using machine learning tools and statistical methods

Detecting an individual’s transportation mode has an invaluable role in applications, by allowing the application to be aware of user’s current context, and modify their functionality accordingly. There has been numerous research in this area, each using a different approach and achieving different outcomes. The goal of this internship to better understand the state of the art technology in classifying modes of transportation (e.g.

Modeling fatal and non-fatal occupational injuries in Saskatchewan: identifying the leading risk fact

Work-related morbidity and mortality not only result in loss of time at work, reduction of the overall productivity, increase of the additional hiring and training costs and increased use of medical and welfare services, but it also results in suffering and hardship for the worker and his or her family. The Workers’ Compensation Board of Saskatchewan (WCB-SK) strives to advance scientific and technical knowledge in understanding the occupational injury and fatality risks to reduce the incidence or severity of injury in Saskatchewan.

Pages