Modeling of Pressurized Chemical Looping Combustion in a Novel Toroidal Fluidized Bed

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technology provides a promising avenue to reduce carbon emissions. CCS works by capturing and storing carbon dioxide preventing it from contributing to climate change. Pressurized Chemical Looping Combustion (PCLC) is a promising next generation CCS technology that use a metal catalyst to react hydrocarbon fuels in an efficient way allowing for cheap and simple capture of carbon. PCLC has been shown at small scales to capture upwards of 90% of carbon dioxide emissions.

Effects of cell culture plastics on dendritic cells activated using ImmunyrTM

Cancer is the leading cause of death in Canada. A promising new way to treat cancer is through the administration of immune cells that target the cancer – an approach called cancer immunotherapy. The goal of this project is to engineer better culture vessels to produce dendritic cells. Dendritic cells are the "gatekeepers" of our immune system. They can have the capacity to activate other immune cells to attack cancers. The project involves two industrial partners: Kanyr Pharma, Inc. and Saint- Gobain, Inc.

Developing niosome-based vehicles to deliver plant immune aids

Innovative approaches that ensure food security in light of the increasing world population, increasing variety of crop pests and microbes, and accelerating climate change are urgently needed. Suncor has developed a novel plant immune aid that can effectively enhance the disease resistance of crops to enhance agricultural yields. Through this collaboration with Dr.

Evaluation of Durable Hydrocarbon-Based Proton Exchange Membrane for Fuel Cell Applications

This MITACS project aims to investigate the durability of IONOMR’s PEMIONTM membranes in Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM)-based fuel cells for automotive applications and explore their usage as the PEM in PEM-based fuel cells. Specific test conditions and protocols for use at IONOMR based on industry standards will be developed and the materials will be benchmarked against current state-of the art materials in order to prioritize development efforts and aid in customer adoption efforts.

Biodegradable fishing nets, prepared through a pH responsive moiety by reactive extrusion

Intern will significantly benefit in terms of knowledge generation and implementation from this research project by learning novel process to shape and modify biopolymer. After successful completion, the intern will learn process to scale up the product to real life application such as fishing line and nets. Plantee Bioplastics will be able to bring the modified product to market and capitalize on research done by the intern. This project has capacity to change the negative public perspective on plastics by bringing in market an improved fishing line and n

Non-Viral Approach to Immunotherapy with Engineered Polymers

A new therapy was developed in order to combat cancers by stimulating our immune system to fight agents the cancer cells in the body. The activated immune system is more efficient to fight the cancer cells than the common drugs, but stimulating the immune system is very expensive and labour-intensive with the currently developed protocols. This project will develop a cost-effective way to stimulate immune system to fight cancers. We will use advanced biomaterials and immune stimulatory genes in order to achieve this.

Morphological investigation of adhesive blends and its effect on multilayer coating performance

In the pipeline industry, the heat shrink sleeves (HSS) are the protective layer usually composed of two layers, namely, an adhesive layer and a crosslinked backing layer such as polypropylene (PP) or polyethylene (PE). In order to maintain the desired properties of HSS, each of the layers must maintain their properties during processing, storage, and installation. In partnership with Canusa-CPS, the proposed research aims at addressing the relationships between the morphological structure and interfacial strength of the adhesive layers with their performance.

Mitigation of product degradation in anesthetic gas capture

This project will assist a company with the commercialization of a system that captures anesthetic gases from hospital air emissions, to reduce their environmental impact and global warming effects. A working system is already developed, but under some conditions the anesthetic gases break down to form a hazardous hydrofluoric acid material. This acid is undesirable and can cause damage to the system equipment over time. This research will identify the root causes and mechanisms for this acid formation.

Enhancement of Wearable Textiles by Living Biofilms

"Smart" clothing that responds to the wearer offers compelling advantages over today's inert clothing. By integrating living cells into the textiles that make up our clothing, we can endow them with these "smart" properties. This includes a shirt that begins to smell like flowers when soaked in sweat, pants that "self-heal" after an accidental tear, or industrial uniforms that detect and actively break down toxins. Lululemon and McGill scientists, working together, are aiming to create some of these wearables by growing living films of engineered bacteria on textiles.

Geographic mapping for small-diameter gas pipelines in a city

Geographic location of a pipeline is important information for pipeline maintenance and fault detection. Usually, the geographic location of a pipeline on the ground can be measured directly with global positioning system (GPS) technology, but it is much difficult to determine the geographic position of an inaccessible underground pipeline in a city. In this research, a new geographic mapping methodology is proposed for small-diameter gas pipelines in a city.

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