Broken Promises: Museum Exhibit Development during the Covid-19 Pandemic

Broken Promises is the capstone output of Landscapes of Injustice, a multi-year, intersectoral project exploring the dispossession of Japanese Canadians during the 1940s. The project illustrates the violation of human and civil rights at a time of perceived insecurity; measures taken in the name of national defence; the enduring harm of mass displacement, and loss of home and property; and human resilience. The traveling exhibit is one of the major research outputs of the project.

Two case studies in the public history of international development policies in Canada: the Lebanese Special Measures Program (1975-1990) and The Life of Lewis Perinbam (1925-2008)

This project will involve the research of international development assistance policy in Canada. It will focus on two case studies: Lebanese Special Measures Program and the life of distinguished Canadian humanitarian Lewis Perinbam. This research would contribute to a better understanding of the history of international development assistance in Canada. The partners in this project are not-for-profit organizations focused on promoting education and community development.

Micro-Histories of Transnational Humanitarian Aid: Co-Creation of Knowledge, Policy, and Education Materials

This project will involve the research and production of micro-histories of non-profit humanitarian organizations based in Canada. By examining small moments in the foundation and work of these organizations, our goal is to contribute to a better understanding of the role of Canadian civil society organizations in international humanitarian programs. Our partners work in a variety of sectors (from refugees to resource extraction-based violence) and in a variety of countries (from Lebanon to DR Congo).

Succeed and Stay

The Greater Saint John area struggles. Too many people are leaving, not enough people are moving in. If this continues, governments will have great trouble. It will be hard to pay for road repairs, keeping schools open and so on. Likewise, employers already struggle to find people for the positions that do open up. Locals either cannot or will not take the several hundred jobs that do exist. The region does attract some immigrants from outside Canada, but only about 25 out of 100 decide to stay here.

Developing Foodways and Gardening Strategies for the L.M. Montgomery Museum & Literary Centre

This project will complete an urgently needed feasibility study linking researchers and graduate students from the University of Guelph with the Lucy Maud Montgomery Museum and Literary Centre (LMMMLC) in Norval. Together, this team of researchers and community partners will define current best practices in museum design to create a plan for the LMMMLC to use in developing an innovative educational facility in Ontario that will commemorate both Lucy Maud Montgomery's legacy and celebrate the history of women in Canada.

Archival Research and Accessioning for the CSCE National History Committee

The proposed research project will determine the significance of and catalog historic papers and documents held by the National History Committee (NHC: established 1983) of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering (CSCE: established as the Canadian Society of Civil Engineers in 1887). These records have been rather haphazardly stored by various Chairs of the NHC since its inception and, if properly organized, will provide a valuable archive for historical researchers that will be housed at the University Ontario Institute of Technology Library.

The History of the Quebec Common Gaol

This is a project to update the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec's permanent exhibit, Doing Time: The Quebec City Common Gaol (1808 – 1867). Since the exhibit was launched in 2011, much research has been done on the history of the gaol.  Doing Time is seen by some 25,000 visitors per year. For some, it is their only exposure to the history of prison life. The exhibit needs to be as accurate as possible. Revision will be done by an intern working under the supervision of Donald Fyson, professor of history at Université Laval and specialist in the gaol's history.

Storytelling the History of Cantonese Migration through Virtual Heritage

Since the 19th century, Chinese men and women have migrated to small towns and cities throughout places such as Southeast Asia, Australia, New Zealand and North America in search of better opportunities, bringing with them many traditional cultural practices, values and customs that evolved over time and space. How did early migrants retain cultural heritage practices? How did people adapt their cultural traditions to local environments? What systems were in place to support the continuation of these practices, and how have these systems evolved over the past century?

Landscapes of Injustice, Curatorial Postdoctoral Fellowship

Amaratunga Railton’s proposed project is to take a leading role in curating the capstone public output of Landscapes of Injustice (LOI). LOI is a 7-year, intersectoral community-engaged research project exploring the dispossession of Japanese Canadians during the 1940s. LOI illustrates (1) the violation of human and civil rights at a time of perceived insecurity; (2) measures taken in the name of national defence; (3) the enduring harm of mass displacement, and loss of home and property; (4) human resilience.

A hidden history: Gentrification in four London, Ontario Heritage Conservation Districts (HCDs)

Heritage Conservation Districts (HCDs) in London Ontario are a success story of architectural heritage preservation. There has been a rapid expansion of designated districts in the city, with the first appearing in 1992 and six more in the years since, with seven more currently on the books. This research will consider residents who relocated outside of the City’s four earliest HCDs post designation, and the reasons for their movement. An animated map will be created, displaying the data in both space and time.

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