Salmon Early Marine Survival Research Program: Phase 2

Salmon are inarguably one of the most culturally, ecologically, and economically important fish in British Columbia, however, their stocks have been declining since the 1990’s. The Cohen Commission of Enquiry expert panel emphasized that juvenile mortality during the first months at sea was the most likely cause of fishery declines. This Mitacs project represents Phase 2 of a research initiative addressing the role of ocean conditions in the early marine survival of juvenile salmon.

Spatial mapping of turbulent characteristics of tidal flow and wakes in the Minas Passage Bay of Fundy

The strong tidal currents that make in-stream tidal energy possible, are also challenging to work in since they are also very turbulent. As the flow passes over the rough bottom and shoreline variations, eddies are generated over a wide range of scales. These eddies (i.e. turbulence) create fluctuating forces on tidal turbine blades and their support structures, degrading turbine performance and operating life. Understanding and predicting the levels of turbulent flows is an important component of the marine services that Luna Ocean provides to its clients.

Environmental productivity patterns of the Salish Sea: trends, impacts, projections

Pacific salmon are important from ecological, economic, social and cultural perspectives, but many species in the Salish Sea have seen drastic decrease in marine survival rate in recent decades, likely linked to reduced survival of the young stages of salmon due to a combination of environmental, food web changes, and human impacts. This activity will provide an ecosystem-level analysis of how the environmental productivity of the Salish Sea has changed in recent decades with focus on the implications this has had for salmon populations in the area.

Predation on Chinook Salmon Smolts by Great Blue Herons

Predation on smolts as they out-migrate down natal rivers may significantly contribute to the decline and lack of recovery of Chinook salmon in British Columbia. A prior study of mortality of Chinook smolts released by the Cowichan Hatchery suggests only a small portion of the fish reached the ocean due to predation by raccoons, river otters, mergansers and trout.

Impact and Vulnerability of Caribbean fisheries

Marine fisheries are complex, multifaceted endeavors that are deeply interconnected with both the ecological and social systems within which they operate. To manage a given fishery resource effectively, practitioners have account in the past years for ecological interactions with other marine species and socio-economic interactions with commercial and subsistence harvesters.

Development of signal processing techniques for animal movement data

In the past decade, the development of sophisticated sensors attached to animals (tags) have researchers to infer of horizontal and vertical movement of marine animals across time and space. The amount of data collected from these tags along with the analytical challenges surrounding the extraction of behavioural patterns has presented a significant barrier for researchers to adopt this technology.

Connecting prey and specialized predator population dynamics: a hundred-and fifty year record of salmon and killer whale interactions

Pacific northwestern southern resident killer whale population only encompasses 74 individuals and is considered endangered. Chinook salmon, the main food source of resident killer whales, is today disappearing from the North American western coast. Yet, it remains unclear to which extent food deprivation is affecting recovery of resident killer populations.

Plankton food web pathways to juvenile salmon

Plankton food-webs are the primary support system for juvenile salmon, necessary for their growth, health, and ultimately survival at sea. Understanding how and why plankton food-webs respond to changing ocean conditions is one of the major goals of the Pacific Salmon Foundation, with the view to understanding fluctuations and declining trends of salmon stocks in the Salish Sea.

Salmon Early Marine Survival Research Program

Salmon are inarguably one of the most culturally, ecologically, and economically important fish in British Columbia, however, their stocks have been declining since the 1990’s. The Cohen Commission of Enquiry expert panel emphasized that juvenile mortality during the first months at sea was the most likely cause of fishery declines. The two leading agents of mortality are hypothesised to be food availability for growth and pathogen / parasite infection. The Hakai Institute Juvenile Salmon Program is explicitly addressing these two hypotheses.

Environmental productivity patterns of the Salish Sea

Pacific salmon are important from ecological, economic, social and cultural perspectives, but many species in the Salish Sea have seen drastic decrease in marine survival rate in recent decades, likely linked to reduced survival of the young stages of salmon due to a combination of environmental, food web changes, and human impacts. This activity will provide an ecosystem-level analysis of how the environmental productivity of the Salish Sea has changed in recent decades with focus on the implications this has had for salmon populations in the area.

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