Plankton food web pathways to juvenile salmon

Plankton food-webs are the primary support system for juvenile salmon, necessary for their growth, health, and ultimately survival at sea. Understanding how and why plankton food-webs respond to changing ocean conditions is one of the major goals of the Pacific Salmon Foundation, with the view to understanding fluctuations and declining trends of salmon stocks in the Salish Sea.

Salmon Early Marine Survival Research Program

Salmon are inarguably one of the most culturally, ecologically, and economically important fish in British Columbia, however, their stocks have been declining since the 1990’s. The Cohen Commission of Enquiry expert panel emphasized that juvenile mortality during the first months at sea was the most likely cause of fishery declines. The two leading agents of mortality are hypothesised to be food availability for growth and pathogen / parasite infection. The Hakai Institute Juvenile Salmon Program is explicitly addressing these two hypotheses.

Environmental productivity patterns of the Salish Sea

Pacific salmon are important from ecological, economic, social and cultural perspectives, but many species in the Salish Sea have seen drastic decrease in marine survival rate in recent decades, likely linked to reduced survival of the young stages of salmon due to a combination of environmental, food web changes, and human impacts. This activity will provide an ecosystem-level analysis of how the environmental productivity of the Salish Sea has changed in recent decades with focus on the implications this has had for salmon populations in the area.

Identifying Stakeholders’ Values in British Columbia’s Pacific Herring Fishery

Pacific herring, as forage fish, provide a vital ecosystem service within marine food webs, as well as economic benefits to BC’s commercial herring industry and cultural benefits to coastal Aboriginal communities. Building on innovative participatory research in Haida Gwaii, this project will identify the values of BC herring industry stakeholders and their preferences for management. Debates about a fishery’s management typically ignore such normative considerations, focusing instead on descriptive biological and economic indicators, such as fish biomass and profit.

Integrated pathogen management of co-infection in Atlantic salmon

The partner in this project is EWOS Canada, a producer of salmon feed. Salmon feed is made with sustainable and Canadian Food Inspection Agency approved ingredients. A major challenge in feed manufacturing is to support maximal growth and health of fish. This project addresses a health challenge which has received little attention in academic programs: that salmon in sea farms often have several infectious agents such as skin lice and bacterial infection.

Acoustically derived indicators of demersal and forage species productivity in the Strait of Georgia, and their link to the survival of juvenile salmon - Year two

With a rich acoustic dataset available in the Strait of Georgia (SoG), we propose this research to develop a series of acoustic indicators of productivity for forage (e.g. Pacific herring, mesopelagic fish, euphausiids, zooplankton and ichthyoplankton) and semi-demersal (e.g. Pacific hake and walleye pollock) species within the SoG by using robust multi-frequency techniques. Along with existing time-series of forage species catch from trawl surveys, the acoustic indicators of productivity will be investigated for potential links to marine survival of juvenile salmon in the SoG.

Acoustically derived indicators of demersal and forage species productivity in the Strait of Georgia, and their link to the survival of juvenile salmon

With a rich acoustic dataset available in the Strait of Georgia (SoG), we propose this research to develop a series of acoustic indicators of productivity for forage (e.g. Pacific herring, mesopelagic fish, euphausiids, zooplankton and ichthyoplankton) and semi-demersal (e.g. Pacific hake and walleye pollock) species within the SoG by using robust multi-frequency techniques. Along with existing time-series of forage species catch from trawl surveys, the acoustic indicators of productivity will be investigated for potential links to marine survival of juvenile salmon in the SoG.

Structural and geochemical controls of mineralization of the Efemςukuru, low-intermediate sulphidation deposit, western Turkey

The MDRU of UBC proposes to conduct a study at the Efemςukuru gold deposit, located 30 km southwest of Izmir, Turkey. Efemςukuru is an example of an ore deposit formed from convecting hot, metal-bearing fluids in an area with abundant faults. One of the key objectives of this project is to identify how the geometry of the faults in the surrounding area controlled the metal-bearing fluids responsible for gold mineralization.

Fluid-flow vectoring, geochemical footprints and structural framework of the Halilağa porphyry Cu-Au deposit: the Paleogene Biga metallogenic province, NW Turkey

The Biga Peninsula in NW Turkey is a very active copper and gold exploration district in the western segment of the Tehyan belt that contains important porphyry-type deposits (eg., Reko Diq, Skouris, Kisladag). Porphyry mineralization deposits are the largest source of copper in the world and the Halilağa porphyry copper-gold deposit is a good example of this type of deposit in Turkey. The geology in the Biga Peninsula has evidence of complex geodynamics processes with continental collision and post-collision episodes.

Structural and Fluid Controls on Mineralisation at the TV Tower and Kirazli Au-Ag Epithermal Deposits, Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey

The proposed geological research project is collaboration between UBC and industry sponsors to evaluate the nature of metallic resources in NW Turkey. Undeveloped concentrations of gold, silver and copper occur in the study region; these occurrences are being actively explored by the partner organizations. In the interest of the partner companies this research project focuses on an area that completely covers mineral tenure licenses owned by the companies.

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