Understanding the Evolving Nature of Refugee sponsors in Canada

This project examines the type of refugee sponsorship groups, their relation to the sponsored refugees, and the challenges and successes that they have faced. This is primary research, using the data that is at this point available but not organised by the partnership organization. It will benefit the partnership organization in giving it an overall, empirically valid assessment of areas of improvement in public policies that are adapted to changing circumstances.

Comparing the value of country foods with other food provisioning systems in Indigenous communities in the Northwest Territories.

How can we describe and value harvesting, processing and sharing (costs as well as benefits) country foods in economic, nutritional, environmental and socio-cultural terms? How can we compare the value of country food with food that comes from other provisioning systems (e.g. imported/market-based foods and local food production)?

Inclusion of Indigenous Knowledge in Resource Decision-making: innovative research methods, guidelines, and digital tools

The objective of our research is to reach appropriate recommendations, revelations, and transformative insights based on a survey of the field of Community-Based Monitoring and its understudied methods, while also developing a more inclusive process to achieve this, and applying that process in the creation or refinement of CBM digital tools. In particular our research focuses on the way Indigenous communities are using CBM to monitor, confront, and intervene in projects that affect their land and ways of life.

The Opportunity Equation

The Opportunity Equation is a multi-year research project that explores trends, dynamics and causes of income inequality in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). The project aims to produce a comprehensive portrait of the changing income distribution and income gaps among key socio-demographic groups in the City of Toronto, York Region and the Region of Peel between 1980 and 2015. It looks beneath aggregated measures on inequality to investigate how much of an income gap exists among various socio-demographic groups and how these gaps change over time.

Drive Continuous Innovation Growth in Canada

Many reports have indicated that with the current state of Canada’s science and technology, Canada is not globally competitive in business innovation, and the current state of growth is not sustainable. How to drive continuous innovation growth in Canada?
This proposal centers on three areas: (1) continuous innovation growth in large incumbents, (2) viable business growth from start-ups, and (3) inter-government collaboration on technology and innovation. Our research of the studies on technology and innovation in Canada has identified them as key weaknesses that need to be addressed.

Improving sustainability and operations in residential development and its relationship to community resilience

The purpose of this qualitative study is to investigate how productivity improvements in a local company could contribute to its municipality’s (community) sustainability goals, and, by extension, to local community resilience. I will be using an action research (AR) methodology to create positive change and productivity improvements in the case of a company as the basis for inductively understanding what mechanisms and impacts lead to sustainability and community resilience. The local company will benefit by implementing productivity improvements and sustainability.

The Scale-up Challenge for Canada? Obstacles to High-Growth Technology-based Firms and the Policy Response

Digitally-enabled technology firms will assume greater significance for Canada’s future economic growth and prosperity. The ability to grow digitally-enabled firms from the startup phase to globally competitive scaled up firms will be a critical part of this challenge. Among the advanced industrial economies, Canada ranks second only to the United States in terms of entrepreneurship, but most Canadian start-ups do not scale successfully.

Reversing the "brain drain": Where is Canadian STEM talent going and why?

Human capital migration, or "brain drain" as it is more commonly known, is a long-debated subject in Canadian public policy. This process involves large-scale emigration of talented individuals, educated in one country, but who choose to work in other countries to seek out higher salaries, prestige or greater occupational mobility. While this phenomenon has been long debated and discussed mostly in relation to doctors and other medical professionals - policymakers in Canada are still often left wondering why highly skilled Canadians opt to work abroad.

Cited: Partnered Knowledge Mobilization Between Research and Media Organizations

Cited is a multimedia knowledge mobilization project that tells stories about research and academia to a general audience. It is experimenting with a unique co-creative approach that puts students, journalists, and researchers together on the same team. Mitacs interns will work with Cited media partners to conduct original research that builds interviews, documentaries, and other media related to research and academia—particularly in the social sciences and humanities. These will be distributed widely through a network of partners across North America.

Optimizing the design and implementation of technology education programs to advance skills and diversity in information and communications technology (ICT) in Canada

There is ample evidence that increasing Canada’s innovation, productivity and competitive advantage depends on expanding its skilled digital workforce to both implement and adopt innovative technologies. Despite the pressing need to increase the digital skills and participation of underrepresented groups in information and communications technology (ICT) industry and programs to diversifying computer science, the numbers have remained persistently low. While some initiatives have demonstrated success, often it is transient and not sustained.

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