Driving fuel cell technology in cars of the future

With a demonstration fleet of B-Class F-Cell vehicles unveiled in 2010, Mercedes-Benz has established itself as a key competitor in this emerging market. The breakthrough came as a result of thousands of hours of research and development into fuel cell technology at Mercedes-Benz’s North American pilot manufacturing plant.

Beehive data creates buzz with farm-to-table technology

Determined to meet new standards for food traceability, head apiarist Allan Campbell sought a technology-based solution to improve record keeping and management of his entire beekeeping operation.

Allan turned to Bruce Hardy, CEO of Winnipeg software company Function Four, for his expertise in software-based records management.

From research to robots

“These people were my heroes,” he said. “I knew that I wanted to follow in their footsteps one day.”

And he did.  At the age of 20, he invented an electronic system to control lighting in luxury houses with the use of a remote. Shortly after, he created an electro-mechanical device that could be installed on the wheels of bikes and vehicles which emitted pulsating lights to increase safety and visibility at night and sold 3,000 units.

Calgary medical start-up taps into research talent through Mitacs

Despite this, many patients who have problems with the quality of their sleep do not seek medical diagnosis, and when they do, diagnosis and initiating treatment can be an arduous process that is disruptive, uncomfortable, and inconvenient.

Harnessing the power of the ocean

His supervisor, Dr. Bradley Buckham, recommended that Clayton apply for a Mitacs Accelerate internship and suggested coastal engineering consultancy Triton Consultants, as the industry partner. 

“When I approached Triton, they were hesitant at first as they were a small company; but when I mentioned the co-funding provided by Mitacs, my internship with them became feasible,” Clayton explained.

Robots in the oil sands

“The system that BMI was using required a lot of manual intervention,” explained Stephen Dwyer, an engineering graduate student from the University of Alberta.

Dwyer and two fellow UAlberta graduate students, Jamie Yuen and Nicolas Olmedo, took up the research challenge through the Mitacs Accelerate program under the supervision of their supervisor, Dr. Mike Lipsett.  By the end of the internship, the team had a working alpha prototype.

Where are they now? Student turns her internship into a rewarding career

“I was deciding between two graduate programs: one included an internship, the other didn't. But my future supervisor informed me that it was still possible through Mitacs Accelerate. That sealed the deal for me: with Mitacs in the picture, I would be able to do exactly what I wanted—stay in Toronto, do research in computational aerodynamics at the University of Toronto's Institute for Aerospace Studies under the supervision of Dr. David W. Zingg, and finish my program with an internship.”

Postcard from Vietnam: grad student researches the human and environmental risks of agricultural growth

Fast forward a few months later, I reached out to him to supervise a project, an opportunity made possible through the Mitacs Globalink Research Award.

I am a master of public health student at the University of Guelph. I am working on a project titled “Health risks of agricultural intensification in Vietnam,” under the supervision of Dr. Sherilee Harper at the University of Guelph, Dr. Tran Thi Tuyet Hanh at the Hanoi School of Public Health, and Dr. Nguyen Viet Hung at the International Livestock Research Institute.

From data to dollars

Enter Hamid Alemohammad. Originally from Iran, Hamid came to Canada in 2006 to pursue a PhD in mechanical engineering at the University of Waterloo.

Following the completion of his degree, he was awarded an eight-month Mitacs Accelerate internship in 2012 with a developer of customized test solutions for automotive components such as power steering equipment, fuel injectors, and throttle bodies. 

Robotic arm to aid with mental health treatment

TMS treatment involves the placement of a magnetic coil near a patient’s head. The coil produces magnetic pulses that induce currents in the patient’s brain. TMS is approved for mental health treatment in Canada and has had promising results treating illnesses such as depression and schizophrenia.

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