Student work for start-up making waves in maritime innovation

Founded by a pair of Dalhousie University alumni of the materials engineering program, Nova Scotia-based Graphite Innovation and Technologies (GIT) is providing opportunities for Dalhousie graduate students to put their research experience into practice through Mitacs internships.  

Best gift ever: a fully staffed lab-in-a-box

There are few words more painful to imagine than “your child has cancer.”

Overhearing these life-altering words prompted Mitacs research intern Taylor Jamieson-Datzkiw to pursue a career in pediatric oncology — that is, cancer treatments for children and young adults.

Using 3D printing to accelerate production of protective gear during COVID-19

With the onset of the COVID-19 crisis, CAMufacturing Solutions Inc. knew they needed to bring their expertise in additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, to support the rising demand for quick production of personnel protective equipment (PPE) for the health care community.

New DNA technology expected to cure genetic diseases

Stargardt’s disease is a rare inherited ocular illness that affects the Canadian population. According to Fighting Blindness Canada, 1 in 8,000 Canadians suffer from Stargardt’s, a degenerative ocular illness that ultimately leads to vision loss. Typically, patients are diagnosed with the disease by the age of 13, and most experience progressive vision loss as they get older. It is not uncommon for patients to develop complete blindness by the age of 35. Still today, despite the many clinical trials taking place, there is no cure for Stargardt’s disease.

Smart factories hail the next industrial revolution

We’re in the midst of another industrial revolution: Industry 4.0. Coined at the 2011 Hannover Fair in Germany, Industry 4.0 is a high-tech strategy that marries computerized manufacturing and the Internet of Things to create so-called “smart factories.”  In the Industry 4.0 age, factory robots communicate with each other and with humans using cyber-physical systems, internet-enabled communications, and cloud computing.

Kelowna company making noise with smartphone technology

While most smartphones are adept at capturing close-range speech, noisy environments like rock concerts pose a different challenge. Screaming crowds drown out the music, leading to poor playback quality on the phone.

LG turned to ESS to develop audio-amplifying microchips that can distinguish between the melody and “malarkey” in a concert venue.

UNB postdoc combines engineering and computer science to improve quality, performance, and safety in factories

Eigen’s CEO, Scott Everett, contacted his former professor, Dr. Rickey Dubay, in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of New Brunswick, to see if he could help. Through a Mitacs Accelerate internship, Professor Dubay, in turn, connected Scott with postdoctoral fellow Soheil Parsa who had the expertise to address the challenge.

Video game tech brings auto assembly into the 21st century

At the start of their collaboration, Professor Cort’s team set out to use game-like software to create simulations that mimic a worker’s motions during the installation of parts on the assembly line. 

Driving fuel cell technology in cars of the future

With a demonstration fleet of B-Class F-Cell vehicles unveiled in 2010, Mercedes-Benz has established itself as a key competitor in this emerging market. The breakthrough came as a result of thousands of hours of research and development into fuel cell technology at Mercedes-Benz’s North American pilot manufacturing plant.

From research to robots

“These people were my heroes,” he said. “I knew that I wanted to follow in their footsteps one day.”

And he did.  At the age of 20, he invented an electronic system to control lighting in luxury houses with the use of a remote. Shortly after, he created an electro-mechanical device that could be installed on the wheels of bikes and vehicles which emitted pulsating lights to increase safety and visibility at night and sold 3,000 units.

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