Fueling Cars, Lighting Up Towns – On A Battery

Timing is everything. In cleantech innovation, it’s the difference between leading and falling behind. For Professor Martin Ordonez’s team at the UBC Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering who work in power electronics and conversion, one of the ways of being ahead is developing clean energy through research in renewable electric vehicles (EV) and power storage.

Harnessing the power of the ocean

His supervisor, Dr. Bradley Buckham, recommended that Clayton apply for a Mitacs Accelerate internship and suggested coastal engineering consultancy Triton Consultants, as the industry partner. 

“When I approached Triton, they were hesitant at first as they were a small company; but when I mentioned the co-funding provided by Mitacs, my internship with them became feasible,” Clayton explained.

Growing a brighter future with Mitacs-Accelerate

But one of the biggest costs greenhouse operators face is for the energy required to run their lighting systems.  Many greenhouses use inefficient electric lights to compliment light from the sun, particularly in winter.

GE Lighting Solutions, based in Lachine, Québec, sought to develop a new range of LED lighting applications for the greenhouse industry which not only cut down on energy use but also increase plant growth and yields.

Starting a research career through Mitacs Elevate PDF

His joint industry-academia Mitacs Elevate research project with Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Inc, a leading global semiconductor design innovator, and the University of Toronto proved to be a winning experience.

Aydin developed a novel methodology to predict thermal transport in AMD’s high-end electronic devices – giving the company a competitive edge in product development and time to market – by studying how heat transfers in various electronic systems. Upon completion of his fellowship, he was hired on as a full-time employee at AMD Markham.

Mitacs Accelerate intern models success for her future

Through a Mitacs Accelerate internship at the end of her Masters at Simon Fraser University, Vivien Lo was asked to  develop a cost-benefit model for their technology— a challenge which landed her a job with the company full-time.

Having already completed Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Cellular Biology, Vivien found herself craving an entry into industry. This led her to SFU’s 2-year Masters of Business Administration for the Management of Technology (MBAMOT) program where she was awarded a Mitacs Accelerate internship for a graduating final project in the fall of 2011. 

Mitacs Accelerate research project pushing boundaries in Canada’s “green” commitment

Through the support of Mitacs Accelerate, John Ashley Scott, a professor of biochemical engineering at Laurentian University, and Greg Ross, associate dean of research at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine were able to assemble a multi-disciplinary, multi-company research venture undertaken by seven Mitacs Accelerate interns.  Involving both a school of process engineering and of medicine this project investigates the potential use of microalgae to produce carbon-neutral fuels and develop pharmaceuticals from microalgae grown on marginal land.