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Cancer patients receive easy access to treatment information

At a glance
The intern

Anton Gladyr from Ukraine’s Kremenchuk Mykhailo Ostrohradskyi National University

Hosted by

Dr. John Kildea in the Gerald Bronfman Department of Oncology at McGill University

The research

Designing a user-friendly interface that summarizes patient information

A new, easy-to-access, mobile app is helping to better inform oncology patients at Montreal's McGill University Health Centre. The app, which is called Opal and currently being used in a pilot study, provides patients with access to their treatment plan, lab results, appointment times, and educational material specific to their diagnosis.

This summer, Mitacs Globalink intern Anton Gladyr, an undergraduate student from Ukraine, is working under the guidance of Professor John Kildea to expand the app’s functionality. Anton is developing a user-friendly interface that will collect data from patients as they undergo treatment.

“Anton’s background as a developer has been a huge support,” says Professor Kildea. “The expanded patient-reported interface will help us collect data for medical research studies and allow the patient to be asked about the state of their health before even meeting their doctor, which saves time for both the patient and medical staff.”

The data collected will allow Professor Kildea’s research team in the Medical Physics Unit at McGill to undertake comparative-effectiveness studies to determine which patient treatments are most effective. “It’s a huge deal for cancer patients to have immediate access to their data and to be able to provide information to doctors about treatment side effects between hospital visits,” cites Professor Kildea about the impact of the research.

“This project stood out for me because it so closely aligned with my education,” says Anton. “But, it’s provided me with so much more. I’m working with a dedicated team of Canadian researchers, learning new skills, and most importantly, taking part in a project that is providing doctors with better understandings of the trends in patients’ symptoms, while giving patients with a chance to be heard.”

 


Mitacs thanks the Government of Canada and the Government of Quebec for their support of the Globalink research internship in this story. Across Canada, the Globalink research internship program also receives support from the Government of Alberta, the Government of British Columbia, the Government of Saskatchewan, and Research Manitoba. 

In addition, Mitacs is pleased to work with the following international partners to support Globalink: Universities Australia; Brazil's Unidersidade de Sao Paulo; the China Scholarship Council; Campus France; the German Academic Exchange Service; Mexico’s Secretariat of Public Education, Tecnológico de Monterrey, and the National Autonomous University of Mexico; Saudi Arabia’s Ministry of Education; Tunisia’s Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, and Mission Universitaire de Tunisie en Amerique du Nord; and the Ukrainian-Canadian Foundation of Taras Shevchenko.