National Occupancy Standards Research Project -BC-513

Desired discipline(s): Architecture and design, Social Sciences & Humanities, Gender and sexuality studies, Law, Political science, Public administration, Social work, Sociology
Company: BC Society of Transition Houses
Project Length: 4 to 6 months
Preferred start date: 10/01/2020
Language requirement: English
Location(s): Vancouver, BC, Canada; Canada
No. of positions: 1
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About the company: 

The BC Society of Transition Houses is a member-based, provincial umbrella organization that, through leadership, support and collaboration, enhances the continuum of services and strategies to respond to, prevent and end violence against women, children and youth.

Please describe the project.: 

The goal of this research is to reduce barriers to housing for women experiencing violence that are created by the implementation of the National Occupancy Standards.

The research conducted will result in a policy analysis, policy recommendations, and knowledge translation materials on the National Occupancy Standards and their unintended barriers to housing for women experience violence. This research will be gathered through stakeholder engagement, an environmental scan, and qualitative data gathering (interviews or focus groups) to determine the key issues, the relevant research on this topic, and the ideas and perspectives of service providers dealing with the policy. By shedding light on this issue, our hope is that policy changes can be implement and housing options can become more available for women experiencing violence.

Required expertise/skills: 

  • Research skills (conducting environmental scan and qualitative research)
  • Experience with policy analysis
  • Ability to liaise with stakeholders and project partners
  • Good written and oral communication
  • Knowledge of violence against women, the community housing sector and housing policy is an asset