Mapping anthropogenic noise in Alberta using passive acoustic monitoring data

Noise from human activities negatively affects the well-being of humans and wildlife alike. In rural areas, ecosystems that are relatively undisturbed by human activities may still be subjected to noise exposure from vehicles passing nearby, industry-related noise (e.g., compressor stations), or from airplanes overhead. To date, however, little work has been done to quantify what proportion of Canada’s land area might be exposed to anthropogenic noise, and how much noise is out there.

Advancing methods and understanding: Status and drivers of mammal populations in Alberta

Biodiversity loss is a major concern worldwide. Alberta’s has abundant natural resources; however, developing these natural resources can impact species, including mammal species and those valued by the public. Understanding the impacts of disturbance on populations of mammals is necessary in order to inform environmental management.

Assessing habitat-dependent variation in distribution and abundance of aquatic Invertebrates in Alberta wetlands

This study examines the effect of human footprint and habitat characteristics on aquatic invertebrate abundance and distribution among wetlands across the province of Alberta.

Sound localization for acoustic monitoring of bird populations in response to fire and oil extraction in Alberta’s oil sands region

Sound localization involves the triangulation of the location of a sound source by recording it on multiple microphones. One potential application of sound localization technology is to monitor the movements of vocalizing animals passively, without the need for a human observer. This project aims to further develop and test sound localization technology, then to apply the technology to monitor the movements and behaviours of birds in Alberta’s oilsands region in the vicinity of inactive well pads in burned and unburned areas.