Fractal-element based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Coils for Multi-nuclear Imaging

An MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scanner is a machine that uses magnets and radio waves to take pictures of the inside the human body without needing to use surgery. An MRI scanner is used to look at things like the brain, liver, heart, and other organs in your body. The scanner uses a “coil” placed near the body to take a picture of that area of the body. This research project uses new shapes of coils to better detect the organs hidden inside. The new shapes of coils can also help detect

Application of Brain 23Na "Big Data" for Future Disease Classification

Sodium is a chemical ion which is essential for a healthy brain. The body naturally regulates its concentration inside and outside of cells through normal metabolism. Disruptions in this intricate balance can be caused by various neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, concussion, or Alzheimer's disease. In order to provide personalized medical care, a "big-data" approach is required whereby an individual's brain can be compared to a standardized template or atlas; unfortunately, a sodium atlas, representing normal sodium concentrations, is not currently available.

Improving 23Na – Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging through RF Coil Development

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machines use radiowaves and large magnets to safely produce pictures from the insides of the body. The radiowaves are emitted and detected by special antennas that surround the body. Most MRI scanning involves measuring of water in the body. But other atoms, like sodium, can also be seen too. This work described here involves designing new antennas to safely see sodium inside the body. More specifically these antennas will be designed based on novel geometric fractal shapes, which are regularly seen with cell phones.