Synchrotron imaging of Saskatchewan amber and dinosaur fossils

Saskatchewan has a rich Late Cretaceous fossil record (~66 million years ago), which provides opportunities to study both fossilized resin (amber) and dinosaur skeletons from shared habitats. Synchrotron X-rays are a powerful new tool that can be used to CT scan fossils and create 3D models of microscopic structures, and to map out the chemistry of preserved material. The proposed project will use synchrotron techniques to 3D-model insects in amber for new species descriptions, and to explore how soft tissues are preserved within these specimens.

Dinosaur bonebed amber: paleoecological and paleoenvironmental reconstructions

Amber, or fossilized tree resin, is a natural trap that provides a valuable source of palaeontological data on insects in ancient ecosystems. The chemistry and composition of the amber itself can also be used to explore which trees produced each amber deposit, and what conditions these trees lived under. Western Canada contains multiple amber deposits near the end of the Cretaceous period (66 million years ago), and small quantities of amber have been found in the sediments of dinosaur bonebeds.

Knowledge mobilization: Local community engagement, sustainability and adaptive governance

Knowledge mobilization is a complex process aimed at generating and disseminating information and expertise. It relates to decision-making in a complex and uncertain environment and requires the development of multiple networks to integrate different institutions and steer their resources. Managing such dynamic social-ecological networks can be addressed as a matter of adaptive governance which integrates the processes of generating multi-level social learning and preserving community heritage.

Local community engagement: White Butte Eco-museum Heritage Ecology Project

Ecomuseums are primarily community-based endeavors that respond to local needs while concentrating on sustainability. They help guide and develop democratic projects that focus on connections to local history and heritage, which include local physical geographic features, natural resources, natural habitats and agricultural practices. This research concentrates on creating an educational program to be delivered on a local conservation easement in southern Saskatchewan.

Ecomuseums: Local community engagement, identity and governance.

Ecomuseums are primarily community-based endeavors that respond to local needs while concentrating on sustainability. They help guide and develop democratic projects that focus on connections to local history and heritage, which include local physical geographic features, natural resources, natural habitats and agricultural practices. This research concentrates on three case studies in southern Saskatchewan to study ecomuseum citizen participation and governance. Three unique ecomuseums are used as case studies.