Regulating Abnormal Connectivity in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder via Real-time fMRI Neurofeedback - Year two

Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are characterized by decreased prefrontal cortex (PFC) regulation on hyperactive emotion generation regions, such as the amygdala. Real-time (rt)-fMRI neurofeedback allows for localized brain regions to be self-regulated through neuroimaging signal feedback. Recently within our lab, learning to decrease amygdala activation via neurofeedback was shown to normalize the neural circuitry maintaining PTSD, which was negatively correlated to symptoms.

Regulating Abnormal Connectivity in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder via Real-time fMRI Neurofeedback

Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are characterized by decreased prefrontal cortex (PFC) regulation on hyperactive emotion generation regions, such as the amygdala. Real-time (rt)-fMRI neurofeedback allows for localized brain regions to be self-regulated through neuroimaging signal feedback. Recently within our lab, learning to decrease amygdala activation via neurofeedback was shown to normalize the neural circuitry maintaining PTSD, which was negatively correlated to symptoms.

Management of posttraumatic stress disorder: a multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Traumatic events such as work related accidents, injuries or assault may result in the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This condition is associated with sleep disruption, nightmares, anxiety, and avoidance of the environment where the traumatic event occurred. Significant proportions of patients diagnosed with PTSD are disabled from working; however, little is known regarding which treatments are most effective for improving functional recovery. Existing research mainly focuses on the effect of treatment for reducing symptoms, and looks at treatments in isolation (e.g.

A Study of Clients’ and Staff Perspectives of the Guelph Assertive Community Treatment Team’s Use of Community Treatment Orders

This study will give voice to the experiences and opinions of men and women diagnosed with serious mental illness who are clients of the Guelph Assertive Community Treatment Team (ACTT) and at the same time subject to Community Treatment Orders (CTOs). Instituted in 2005, CTOs require that individuals abide by certain conditions in order to live in the community; they are intended to provide comprehensive community support for these individuals such that admission to hospital is decreased. The study will also increase knowledge about how and why CTOs are used by service providers.