Finite element modelling for the assessment of dented pipelines

Pipelines are extensively used across Canada and worldwide as a safe, reliable, and environmentally friendly way of transporting oil and gas. The pipelines traversing different ground conditions are sometimes subjected to minor mechanical damages from external interference. A dent is a type of mechanical damage resulting in a plastic deformation of the pipe wall. The proposed research focuses on developing a cost-effective solution for the dented pipes with an assessment of the performance of the pipes using numerical modeling.

Reliability evaluation of strain-based design for pipelines using probabilistic demand/capacity models. - Year two

Ground movement can impose excessive deformation violating pertinent pipeline limit states. Currently, the integrity assessment of pipelines subjected to soil movement is generally performed by analyzing the stresses and/or strains in pipelines using various engineering techniques, including finite element analysis (FEA). However, given the wide variability of the pipe and soil engineering properties, using deterministic approaches alone may be inadequate.

Evaluation of the effects of pipe-soil interaction on the stress based design of buried pipelines using advanced numerical modeling

Thermal stress analysis of the buried pipeline is an integral part of pipeline design and integrity analysis. Pipeline design code (e.g. CSA Z662) provides guidance on the thermal stress analysis of restrained and unrestrained pipe sections. However, a buried pipeline bend is more likely to be partially restrained, as the pipe is free to expand longitudinally, but the expansion is restrained by the pipe-soil interaction. No clear guidance is provided in the design code for a partially restrained condition.

Uplift pipe-soil interaction under inclined ground surface

It is crucial to understand soil-pipeline interaction to be able to design buried pipes against Geohazards. Soil-pipe interaction in the level ground is well established, and the current design practice is based on the assumption that a pipe is installed on a flat ground surface. In reality, however, pipelines often cross natural slopes and sometimes riverbanks. The design of pipes embedded in slopes is different in the way that the inclination of the ground surface has found to affect the soil load significantly.

Reliability evaluation of strain-based design for pipelines using probabilistic demand/capacity models

Ground movement can impose excessive deformation violating pertinent pipeline limit states. Currently, the integrity assessment of pipelines subjected to soil movement is generally performed by analyzing the stresses and/or strains in pipelines using various engineering techniques, including finite element analysis (FEA). However, given the wide variability of the pipe and soil engineering properties, using deterministic approaches alone may be inadequate.

A study on soil-pipe interaction: effects of slope grade

Transmission pipelines are the most popular and widely used medium to transport hydrocarbons (e.g., oil and gas) over long distances. Pipelines might pass through various geological and topographic conditions and therefore, pipeline routing is a critical component for successful design and regulatory approval. Due to the environmental and safety concerns or constraints imposed by the land use, pipeline routing often requires designers to allow for crossing adverse ground, e.g. steep slopes, valleys and faults.