Annual survey of Ontario’s publicly funded education system

Over the past 15 years, People for Education has conducted a survey of Ontario’s publicly funded schools. From this large-scale survey, People for Education produces research reports on public education in Ontario that are widely disseminated to the public and have been instrumental to informing educational policy in the province.

Measuring What Matters in Education

The central goal of this research project is to broaden measurement of school performance across Canada by developing, collecting, and measuring data on six performance indicators as follows: academic achievement, physical health, social-emotional development, creativity, citizenship, and school climate. Having developed competencies in these areas during phase one of the project, the current phase aims to begin the process of measuring the indicators of interest and reporting on results. Survey data will be collected and integrated with existing government data sources.

Measuring what matters in education

This research project aims to provide a robust account of school performance across Canada by collecting and measuring data on six critical indicators. These indicators are academic achievement, physical and mental health, social-emotional development, creativity and innovation, citizenship and democracy, and school climate. To address this inquiry, survey data will be collected and integrated with existing government data sources to aptly measure the six indicators.

Exploring the digital divide: The use of digital tools in Ontario public schools

Governments around the world are investing to bridge the “digital divide,” which refers to the gap among populations in terms of ability to access digital tools and the Internet. This effort is especially evident in public schools, because education has been identified as one contributing factor of the divide. Thus, it is of great public interest to investigate whether schools are providing enough opportunities for youth to engage with ICT as an effort to bridge the digital divide. This proposed research seeks to develop a deeper understanding of ICT use in Ontario’s public schools.

Patterns of course-taking and transition for Applied to Academic subjects in Ontario Schools

Across the province, students are channeled into academic and applied programs at the start of high school. Students in applied courses are less likely to enjoy school or pass the provincial standards for achievement in both elementary and secondary school (EQAO, 2012). We know little about “who” takes applied courses in Ontario and what opportunities exist for them to transfer into academic streams.