QU02 MRI: a new window on mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease

This project seeks to develop new methods for imaging oxidative and vascular function in the brain. The methods under development are based on widely available MRI hardware, which will make them feasible for use in future clinical drug trials, an application that is of interest to the partner organization CQDM. Before the approach is ready for commercial application, a number of methodological issues must be addressed to achieve optimal sensitivity, specificity, and tolerability in patients.

Selectomics to monitor and predict the emergence of resistance to new therapeutic approaches

Multiple antibiotic resistances have increased over the past decades, challenging our ability to treat bacterial infections and thwarting our ability to develop new antimicrobial agents. Many resistance genes have not evolved within the pathogenic isolates but were acquired by lateral transfer. We recently showed that genes conferring glycopeptide resistance are highly prevalent in the human flora. Some of these genes are present in novel commensal anaerobic species of the gut suggesting that these bacteria may serve as a reservoir for resistance genes.

SN-38 (or 5-FU) drug encapsulation in liposomes transported by magnetotactic bacteria for localized colorectal cancer treatment

 

Cancers are treated today with the appropriate combination of chemotherapy drugs, surgery and radiation. Chemotherapy is almost invariably dosed intravenously, and enters the systemic blood flow where it circulates around the whole body, coming into contact with healthy cells as well as cancerous ones. This systemic dosing has two big problems: too little drug gets to cancer cells, and too much drug comes into contact with healthy cells, causing side effects. Frequently, these dose-limiting side-effects prevent us from delivering the maximally effective anti-cancer drug dose.