Modeling Wind loading on Roof-mounted Solar Modules

Rooftop solar modules installations are growing in popularity as the benefits of implementing these features on previously unoccupied roof space are being realized. A major concern with these installations is the contribution to the roof load due to the interaction between high wind speeds and the angled modules. Similarly, there are concerns with uplift on the backside of the modules. These loads can lead to high cost of the structural support for the modules.

Exposing the Invisible ? Wind?s Potential in Architecture

The objective of this project is to improve the communication between architects and wind engineers so that affects associated with wind such as pedestrian comfort, building strength and ventilation may be considered earlier on within the design phase of a project. By documenting the development of the invisible yet extremely prominent winds that flow through the intersection of Bay and King in Toronto, Ontario, I hope to apply and emphasize how key concepts of aerodynamics apply to a full-scale example that is relatable.

Exposing the Invisible – Designing with the Uncertainty of Wind

The objective of this project is to connect architects and wind engineers early on within a project so that affects associated with wind such as pedestrian comfort and building strength may be maintained from the start of a project. Rather than making post-construction modifications to a building through the costly use of screens, covers or even redesign, favorable wind conditions could be achieved through the collaboration between architects and wind engineers during the initial stages of design.