Genes to affordable medicines - Stream 1-A1

The Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) is a not-for-profit public-private partnership research organization that aims to accelerate the discovery of new medicines through open science. This Mitacs cluster will bring together SGC’s industry and academic collaborators to work together towards new and affordable medicines for challenging diseases. Sixty-three post-doctoral fellows will spend 2-3 years developing open source tools and knowledge for previously understudied proteins, thereby unlocking new areas of biology and identifying new opportunities for drug discovery.

Genes to affordable medicines - Stream 1-A2

The Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) is a not-for-profit public-private partnership research organization that aims to accelerate the discovery of new medicines through open science. This Mitacs cluster will bring together SGC’s industry and academic collaborators to work together towards new and affordable medicines for challenging diseases. Sixty-three post-doctoral fellows will spend 2-3 years developing open source tools and knowledge for previously understudied proteins, thereby unlocking new areas of biology and identifying new opportunities for drug discovery.

Targeting SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) methyltransferases (nsp14 and nsp10-nsp16 complex) toward developing small molecule antiviral therapeutics - Part 2

COVID-19 pandemic has brought the world to standstill with more than 55 million people infected to-date and more than 1.34 million mortality so far. It has literally brought the health care systems in many countries to the breaking point, if not beyond. The economic consequences have been devastating with millions of people out of work. We are taking a novel approach by focusing on two SARS-CoV2 (COVID-19) methyltransferases that are essential for viral replication. Both enzymes (nsp14 and nsp16) are druggable.

Genes to affordable medicines - Stream 2-L

The Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) is a not-for-profit public-private partnership research organization that aims to accelerate the discovery of new medicines through open science. This Mitacs cluster will bring together SGC’s industry and academic collaborators to work together towards new and affordable medicines for challenging diseases. Sixty-three post-doctoral fellows will spend 2-3 years developing open source tools and knowledge for previously understudied proteins, thereby unlocking new areas of biology and identifying new opportunities for drug discovery.

Defining epigenetic drivers of primary and metastatic medulloblastoma - Year two

Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common childhood brain cancer. Current treatment for these tumors is invasive involving irradiation of the entire brain and spine. Although some types of MB respond well, others have an abysmal prognosis, and the lack of less invasive therapies means that children undergoing treatment suffer from severe developmental defects and reduced quality of life.

Epigenetic Regulators of Anticancer Drug Response

The effectiveness of cancer drugs depends on several factors which are governed by the genetic and ‘epigenetic’ code of cancer cells. The epigenetic code comprises those heritable modifications that bookmark DNA and DNA-associated proteins to guide the expression of genetic attributes without changing the DNA sequence. This epigenetic code is written, read, and erased by a group of proteins known as epigenetic regulators.

Structural characterization and mechanism-based inhibition of TMPRSS2, a human protease that activates SARS-CoV-2

The novel SARS-Coronavirus-2 becomes activated and is infective after interacting with the human TMPRSS2 enzyme, as it primes the virus to enter and hijack lung cells for viral replication. By designing drugs using a strategy that has shown success in inhibiting enzymes structurally similar to TMPRSS2 and understanding the exact shape of this enzyme in greater detail, highly specific drugs can be engineered to block SARS-CoV-2 activation and alleviate symptoms contributing to COVID-19 mortality.

Development of targeted degradation of Nuclear Receptor Binding SET Domain Protein 2 (NSD2) by Proteolysis-targeting chimera (PROTAC) for the study of its role in SARS-CoV-2 infections

The recent outbreak of the SARS-CoV-2 associated coronavirus disease, COVID-19, had been declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization. There is still only a minimal understanding of the virus and an absence of effective targeted therapy for its treatment. Epigenetic regulations in cells control the expression of genes without modifications to the genetic codes itself, and epigenetic-targeted therapy development had been widely proposed as a promising approach to antiviral therapeutics.

Targeting SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) methyltransferases (nsp10-nsp14 and nsp10-nsp16 complexes) toward developing small molecule antiviral therapeutics

COVID-19 pandemic has brought the world to standstill with more than 3 million people infected and more than 200 000 mortality so far. It has literally brought the health care systems in many countries to the breaking point, if not beyond. The economic consequences have been devastating with millions of people out of work. We are taking a novel approach by focusing on two SARS-CoV2 (COVID-19) methyltransferases that are essential for viral replication. Both enzymes (nsp14 and nsp16) are druggable.

Chemical targeting of HDAC6 as a strategy for anti-viral drug discovery

The emergence of viral pandemics, exemplified by the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19), has exposed the urgent need for the development of viral infection therapeutics. In a short span of time, more than 1.5 million individuals have been infected and there have been nearly 90, 000 deaths worldwide. Our objective is to pharmacologically validate a new strategy for viral infection therapeutics by designing molecules that inhibit HDAC6, a protein implicated in viral entry.

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