Implementation, Demonstration, and Evaluation of a Cloud-Based Smart Dual Fuel Switching System (SDFSS) for the Hybrid Integrated HVAC System in a Net-Zero Energy House

Energy consumption of a net zero energy home (NZEH) equipped with high efficiency natural gas fired furnace and an electrical air source heat pump will be monitored for a period of 12 months. The mechanical system of the house is designed to switch between these two sources of energy based on outdoor temperature. Based on current settings, heat pump works during milder/warmer weather condition and when temperature reaches below a certain point, system switches to furnace which works more efficiently in cold weather.

Modelling, simulation, field evaluation and feasibility study of gas heat pumps (GHPs) in cold climate–Canada

Despite the abundance of natural gas resources and relatively lower price of gas per unit energy compared to electricity gas-fired heat pumps (GHPs) have not been widely used in Canada. This project will study the feasibility of two types of (GHPs), i.e., gas engine-driven heat pump (GEHP) and gas-fired absorption heat pump (GAHP) for buildings located in Canada. The project will include making theoretical models for prediction of performance and energy savings, which would be verified by comparison with actual performance data.

Maximizing Efficiencies - Identification of Optimization Based Best Practices for Commercial 3d-printing

There is growing pressure from intergovernmental organizations, governments and consumers to reduce the quantity of greenhouse gases being released into the atmosphere. Investments in green technology such as renewable energy sources, battery technology and carbon capture and sequestration can often yield significant reductions in carbon emissions. However, the corresponding economic costs of these projects can regularly result in a balancing act between environmental benefit and affordable energy consumption. Smart Energy Network, SEN, systems could provide a solution to this dilemma.

Comprehensive study of tri-generation system based on ClimateWell technology for Canadian residential homes

A feasibility study will be conducted for a proposed tri-generation (generation of heat, electricity and cooling) using a Stirling engine and a ClimateWell heat activated chiller. The Stirling engine will provide simultaneous heat and electricity from burning natural gas. The heat from the engine will be transferred to either space heating, domestic hot water heating, or to the heat activated chiller. The chiller will then be able to provide space cooling.

Mattamy Homes Green Initiative Program

This research project proposes the exploration of various mechanical systems configured in two residential homes in Milton, Ontario. The primary goal is to determine the energy consumption and monetary costs associated with integrating new technologies of both heating and cooling requirements of a new home. Refinement of previously collected data and software modeling are keys to providing successful long term projections on potential savings in energy usage and economic payback periods.