Applying social psychological research to improve hearing rehabilitation outcomes for persons with hearing loss - Duplicated

Millions of Canadians experience hearing loss that impairs functioning and participation in everyday life, however, only a fraction of these individuals address this loss by adopting and using hearing aids. To address this gap, hearing aid research has traditionally focused on the biology of the ear to improve technical aspects of hearing aids as well as on individual factors related to hearing aid adoption (e.g., degree of hearing aid impairment).

Hearing aid sound quality optimization across different hearing aid styles

Hearing aids are a common intervention for hearing loss and current devices use sophisticated signal-processing to improve speech intelligibility (i.e., understanding words). These functions may also be detrimental to sound quality (i.e., “goodness” of sound) and this detriment can be a significant barrier to hearing aid satisfaction. Increasing the hearing aid bass response can improve sound quality but doing so is not always achievable. Hearing aids do not always seal the ear, which allows for bass content to leak from the ear.

Effects of choir participation and musical training on auditory processing in hearing aided older adults.

Hearing loss, which most adults will experience to some degree as they age, has been associated with decreased emotional wellbeing and reduced quality of life in aging adults. Although hearing aids can target aspects of peripheral hearing loss, persistent perceptual deficits are widely reported. One prevalent example is the loss of the ability to perceive speech in a noisy environment, which severely impacts quality of life and goes relatively unremediated by hearing aids.

Improving Hearing Aid Processing for Live Music

The goal of this project is to improve the processing on hearing aids for music. Currently hearing aids are designed for speech, but for some hearing aid users music is an important part of their lives. A concert where the room acoustics are changed will be used to collect audio samples for testing changes to the hearing aids to improve the quality of live music for hearing aid users.

Development and validation of analysis methods for classification of environments: classification by sound, time, and place

Hearing aids are now fully digital, advanced signal processors that monitor the type of sound coming in to the hearing aid. The sound type is automatically classified into one of several types, such as speech in a quiet place, versus telephone listening, versus in a noisy car. These sound types may require different signal processing from the hearing aid. Accordingly, the hearing aid an automatically switch into different signal processing when the sound type changes. Current methods for sound type classification do not monitor the user’s location.

Maximizing Benefit from Hearing Technologies for Persons with Early Stage Alzheimer’s Disease Year One

There is a strong connection between hearing loss and cognitive impairment, particularly dementia, in old age. The number of Canadians with dementia is expected to reach 9% of adults over the age of 60 by 2038. With these large numbers and limited health resources, caregiving will increasingly fall upon family and friends. Caregiving for persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is frequently associated with elevated levels of emotional and physical distress.

Maximizing Benefit from Hearing Technologies for Persons with Early Stage Alzheimer’s Disease Year One

There is a strong connection between hearing loss and cognitive impairment, particularly dementia, in old age. The number of Canadians with dementia is expected to reach 9% of adults over the age of 60 by 2038. With these large numbers and limited health resources, caregiving will increasingly fall upon family and friends. Caregiving for persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is frequently associated with elevated levels of emotional and physical distress.

"Maximizing Benefit from Hearing Technologies for Persons with Early Stage Alzheimer’s Disease *Renewal, previous title ""Maximizing Benefit from Hearing Technologies for Persons with Early Stage Alzheimer’s Disease Year One"""

There is a strong connection between hearing loss and cognitive impairment, particularly dementia, in old age. The number of Canadians with dementia is expected to reach 9% of adults over the age of 60 by 2038. Given the high percentage of older individuals affected by each of these conditions, it is expected that many older adults will have dual hearing and cognitive loss, and that these losses will combine to affect their everyday functioning, communication, social engagement and quality of life.

Contextual Momentary Assessments of the Auditory Environment by Wearers of Hearing Aids

We would like to investigate the use of hearing aids in real life environments. Retrospective questionnaires are often subject to memory errors and recall biases. In order to obtain more accurate momentary evaluations of sound and noise, our proposed research involves asking participants to complete real-time evaluations in the laboratory and in their everyday environments. The momentary assessments will be recorded using a mobile evaluation tool.

eHealth and hearing loss: Effect of remote programming of hearing aids and rehabilitation support on device usage

Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are poised to have increasingly larger roles in health care systems globally and one possible scenario is that Ontario emerges as a leader in providing eHealth innovation and service delivery.  Although ICT-based methods of service delivery are well established in particular areas of health care, the potential benefits for hearing health care have not been fully realized due to a number of technological and non-technological barriers.  Foremost among them, successful aural rehabilitation requires face-to-face consultations where practitioner