Bunsen Reaction study as a key step of H2S Splitting cycle in Corning Advanced Flow Reactor

Currently, microreaction technology was applied to Bunsen reaction, a key step of H2S splitting cycle, to improve process capability by overcoming mass transfer limitations. This was achieved by using low-flow advanced reactor (LF-AFR) made by Corning Inc., the smallest model, in our research lab at University of Saskatchewan. Compared to normal scale reactors, microreactors provide an increase in surface to volume ratio, fast and reliable process development, lower environmental impact, and increased safety.

Game theoretic modeling of joint forest management in India

The project involves conducting of field experiments to derive social preferences and discount rates of the individuals in Indian villages. Government of India had launched the joint forest management (JFM) program in 1990, whereby local community is involved in the forest management. The program has not been uniformly successful across the country.

Outcome and Resource Use of Patients with Primary Liver Cancer

Primary liver cancer (PLC) is one of the fastest growing cancer in Canada and is a heavy global burden. To efficiently allocate the health care resource to the patients with PLC, outcome and cost analysis of the patients with PLC may be a right direction. In order to obtain enough information to accurately assess the status of patients with PLC, this proposed study will take advantages of Electronic Health Record (EHR) data.

Association Mapping of Phytochemical Composition and Antioxidant Properties in Whole Grain Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

Phytochemicals including vitamins, carotenoids and phenolic compounds have been widely accepted as the functional substances that make cereal grain health beneficial. Increasing evidence has shown the relation between these antioxidant phytochemicals and reduced risks of oxidative-stress related chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and some cancers. Among these cereal grains, rice is of critical importance in agriculture, because of its wide consumption over the world.

Postcard from Turkey: University of Ottawa master’s student helps contain greenhouse gases

At the University of Ottawa’s Chemical and Biological Engineering department, I work with Dr. Tezel and Dr. Boguslaw Kruczek to investigate the potential for inorganic membranes to capture greenhouse gases. Although these membranes are well suited to large-scale applications, they are a few years away from industrial implementation.

Postcard from Brazil: UBC student brings laser experiment to Rio de Janeiro

I knew I wouldn’t pass up the opportunity but I was still scared.  When I arrived in Rio de Janeiro, I had no idea what to expect. It was my first trip to South America, I didn’t speak any Portuguese, and I only knew my Brazilian supervisor, whom I’d met once before.

After I landed, I was greeted at the airport and taken to UFRJ and then to my apartment in Santa Teresa, an old neighbourhood on a hill. Once I looked out my window and saw the view of the bay and Sugarloaf Mountain, I realized just where I was. It was amazing.

Postcard from Turkey: Ryerson PhD candidate harnesses the sunshine of Izmir for his research project

The application process went by quickly. After my project was approved, my host university, Dokuz Eylül University in Izmir, Turkey, kindly offered me a good room and daily breakfast in the university residence.

Postcard from China: Western University student is establishing pest control strategies

At Western University, I work with Genomics in Agricultural Pest Management (GAP-M), an international consortium with researchers from Canada, Spain, Belgium, France, and the United States. GAP-M is focusing on the study of spider mite genomes to develop strategies to reduce crop damage and increase yields. By using comparative analysis of three spider mite species’ genomes and their feeding models, we hope to find new systems for pest control strategies.

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