Electric Vehicle Components Modeling

Vehicle electrification poses considerable challenges on chassis architecture, design of vehicle control and power management systems. Moreover, it tends to induce variations in the sprung and unsprung masses and load distributions. A combination of these has a significant impact on vehicle system dynamics and stability. Thus, development of next-generation electric vehicles
(EV) necessitates a systematic exploration of fundamental EV dynamics and stability characteristics. Such exploration, however, should be based on effective modeling of electric vehicle systems. In this project the student will work with a large research team to model EV components and overall system. Considering the fact that there could be a number of alternative EV system architectures, the system modeling development will be as modular as possible. Since there are different applications for these models, the research team will generate necessary models using MapleSim and CARSIM. The models of the main EV components including tires, powertrain, suspension, electric motors, regenerative brakes, battery, hybrid energy storage systems, etc will be used to arrive at a complete system model of an EV vehicle. Although these models will be general, the complete models will be for a mule vehicle provided by our industrial partner. The validity of the models will be examind and compared with both CARSIM and experimental data from the components testing and mule vehicle.

The MITACS supported student involved in this project will be responsible for the initial studies and modeling of an electric power assisted steering system. He/she will work directly with a MASc student under a postdoctoral fellow. The student will study the current designs of electric power assisted steering systems and develop initial models in Maplesim to predict the system response.
 

Intern: 
Keerthi Nagothu
Faculty Supervisor: 
Dr. Amir Khajepour
Province: 
Ontario