Evaluating the impacts and acceptability of a fresh food prescription program on health, food security, and social connectivity in Guelph, Ontario: A quasi-experimental study

Food security is a serious public health concern in the Guelph region, with prevalence of food insecurity surpassing the provincial and national averages. There is a need for community-based interventions to support individuals and families struggling with food insecurity and related poor nutrition and health. The proposed research aims to evaluate the impacts and acceptability of a fresh food prescription program, in which healthcare providers ‘prescribe’ fresh food to participants and provide them vouchers redeemable for fresh fruits and vegetables through an online delivery service. Within this project, an intern will facilitate baseline and follow-up food security, dietary intake, and clinical health evaluations to determine the impacts of the intervention on food security, fruit and vegetable consumption, self-reported and clinical health measures, and social connectivity. This research therefore evaluates an innovative new model for healthcare that connects patients with non-therapeutic solutions. We expect that this research will contribute important evidence that will improve patient care and alleviate burdens on the healthcare s

Intern: 
Eleah Stringer
Faculty Supervisor: 
Matthew Little
Province: 
British Columbia
Partner University: 
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