Evaluation of autonomous seating adjustments through subjective and objective measures

Sitting can become particularly problematic when individuals remain in a fixed position for a prolonged period of time. Pressure can develop in the areas of the body that are compressed by the seat, which can lead to a significant reduction in blood flow to the surrounding tissues. As a result, seat adjustability becomes necessary for the maintenance of good health since movement would help relieve pressure from areas of the body compressed by the seat. Using subjective and objective measures of comfort, a fully adjustable manual and new autonomous seating concept will be compared. The intent is to provide the partner organization with a thorough evaluation of the effectiveness of this new seating technology to meet consumer demands.

Intern: 
Russel Boglitch
Faculty Supervisor: 
David Andrews
Province: 
Ontario
Partner University: 
Discipline: 
Program: