Improving 23Na – Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging through RF Coil Development

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machines use radiowaves and large magnets to safely produce pictures from the insides of the body. The radiowaves are emitted and detected by special antennas that surround the body. Most MRI scanning involves measuring of water in the body. But other atoms, like sodium, can also be seen too. This work described here involves designing new antennas to safely see sodium inside the body. More specifically these antennas will be designed based on novel geometric fractal shapes, which are regularly seen with cell phones. These shapes give a much better signal than traditional designs used currently with MRI.

Intern: 
Cameron Nowikow
Faculty Supervisor: 
Michael Noseworthy
Province: 
Ontario
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