Nutrition for Two: development of interactive nutrition research tools and a pretrial for food and nutrition intake trend among the First Nation’s pregnant women

Prenatal alcohol exposure results in a vast spectrum of teratogenic effects and lifelong implications for a child, called fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Since FASD is not genetic-related and there is no treatment to reverse damage caused to the brain, earlier nutrition intervention to pregnant mothers may be a key to prevent or mitigate the severity of FASD. Although First Nations women in Canada are at higher risk for consuming alcohol during pregnancy, there is no information available on their nutritional status, which could provide the justification for the quantity and quality of nutrition provision. This project will identify the nutritional status of drinking pregnant women throughout their pregnancy in relation to the birth parameters of the newborn infants using a novel culturally-appropriate, web-based interactive nutrition research tool. Ultimately, this research project will provide the basis of a nutritional case management system, to facilitate early nutritional interventions for maternal child health and help mitigate the effects of early childhood developmental disorders such as FASD.

Intern: 
Karlee Dyck, Olena Kloss, Heather Giesbrecht
Faculty Supervisor: 
Miyoung Suh
Project Year: 
2015
Province: 
Manitoba
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