Investigating Effects of UV Disinfection on Wastewater Estrogenic Activity

This project is in partnership with the Canadian Water Network. Endocrine disrupting compounds or chemicals (EDCs) generally refer to chemical substances with the capacity to disrupt the endocrine system of animals. Scientific studies on the impacts of EDCs on aquatic wildlife in Canada, particularity studies on fish in the Great Lakes, have brought the issue of EDCs in the aquatic environment to the forefront. Efforts are now ongoing to comprehensively understand the fate of EDCs in wastewater treatment processes and develop effective ways to remove them to satisfactory levels.

Ecological determinants of sustainable aquaculture in British Columbia

Aquaculture (the farming of marine and aquatic organisms) is the fastest growing agri‐food sector in the world and is regularly cited as a primary solution to addressing growing global food deficiency. In British Columbia the aquaculture industry is dominated by two species, Atlantic salmon and Pacific oyster. While the potential economic benefits of this industry are well understood, the direct and indirect ecological consequences are less so. A consistent feature of all industrial scale aquaculture systems is the extremely high density of production animals.

Estimating relative trends in cetacean abundance and distribution from data collected for an opportunistic sighting network (BCCSN)

British Columbia's coastline is home to eighteen species of cetaceans and three species of sea turtles. Nine of these are at risk of extinction. To conserve these species, it is crucial to learn more about their distribution/abundance and habitat use. The British Columbia Cetacean Sightings Network (BCCSN) was established to gather sightings of these species from a network of mariners and coastal citizens. Since then, the BCCSN has received thousands of sightings from hundreds of observers up and down the coast.

Influence of nuclear cytoplasmic interactions on developmental competence of bison

Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a unique technology that allows the preservation of the entire genome from an individual, thereby avoiding dilution of valuable alleles. This is an important criterion in endangered species preservation. Our interest in the Canadian wood bison, a threatened species, has brought us to consider the application of SCNT as a method for embryo production and genome preservation. This project will evaluate the developmental competence of bison embryos produced by interspecies SCNT, whereby a bison donor cell is transplanted into a domestic cattle oocyte.

Habitat Banking Feasibility Study

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) policy under the federal Fisheries Act requires industry to compensate for harmful alteration, disruption or destruction (HADD) of fish habitat. Manitoba Hydro has sometimes experienced difficulty in finding effective and worthwhile projects for compensation. Consequently, compensation projects completed in accordance with the preferences of DFO can sometimes be less effective than desired.

Regional variability of zooplankton population dynamics in the northwest Atlantic: Assessing environmental effects with an Individual-Based Model

The intern in partnership with Fisheries and Ocean Canada will apply an individual‐based model (IBM) to explore spatial variability in environmental forcing on the population dynamics of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus. The IBM will include information on life history processes of C. finmarchicus (including development time, mortality and egg production rates) as well as the influence of food and temperature on these processes.

Hydrodynamic impacts on walleye (sander vitreus) egg and larval distribution and survival in

The primary determinant of fish population size accessible for fisheries is the survival beyond the egg and larval stages. To estimate the number of fish available for harvest therefore, modelers must be able to accurately predict the percent of fish that survive these early life stages. Many species, such as walleye, must reside in nursery areas to survive the larval stage and current flow is a major factor determining their retention in these areas.

Animal Feed Quality at the Vancouver Aquarium – Optimization of Incoming Feed Quality and Maintenance of Feed Quality throughout Storage

The project will be focusing on the safety issues and quality control of the feed in Vancouver Aquarium. By applying a survey at the very beginning, a general knowledge of the whole handling chain procedure will be generated. The survey will be carried out by means of questionnaire, field investigation and sampling and will be concentrated on feed purchasing, receiving, handling, preparing through to feeding the animal.

The Importance of Traditional Kwakwaka’wak Management on the Productivity of Estuarine Root Gardens

The internship will be conducting two research projects related to historical Kwakwaka’wakw root gardens. The first experiment will measure the effect of traditional management on the productivity of one of the native roots (silverweed or potentilla anserine ssp. pacifica) grown in these gardens. The intern will test the effect of two traditional management activities, tilling and weeding, on the length, diameter, and mass of silverweed roots. The second experiment will explore the variables that affect the flavour of silverweed roots.

Estimating Relative Trends in Cetacean Abundance from Data Collected for an Opportunistic Sightings Network

British Columbia’s coastline is home to eighteen species of cetaceans (such as whales, dolphins and porpoises) and three species of sea turtles. Nine of these species are at risk of extinction. To conserve them, it is crucial to learn more about their distribution/abundance and habitat use. The British Columbia Cetaceans Sightings Network (BCCSN) was established to gather sightings of these species from a network of mariners and coastal citizens. Since then, the BCCSN has received thousands of sightings from hundreds of observers up and down the coast.

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