Emissions control and reduction for natural gas engines

The use of natural gas as a fuel for on-road commercial vehicles offers significant benefits, including lower greenhouse gas emissions. Methane, the main component of natural gas, has many virtues as a fuel. One of these benefits is that it is a very stable molecule. This stability does introduce a challenge: it is hard to remove from the exhaust stream any methane that isn’t consumed in the engine. This internship will help to address this factor, focusing on using a catalytic reactor in the exhaust of an engine.

3D Printable conductive nanocomposite sensors for CRFID moisture, strain, and temperature sensing in composite pipes

Transportation of oil and gas through pipeline networks remain a crucial infrastructure for sustainable economic growth in Canada. Pipeline wear and damage will remain a major concern as it can lead to catastrophic failures causing environmental and economic damage if undetected. For easier detection of damage on a large network of pipelines, an array of wireless radio frequency identification tags was developed for steel pipes. However, the material used for the tags were not suitable for pipes made with polymer composites as the stiffness of the copper could damage it.

Experimental Evaluation of Surface and Deep Filtration Sand Control Solution

Sand production during extraction of bitumen in oil sand industry is the most significant challenge which results in many operational problems such as erosion of downhole and surface equipment, collapse of the formation, and subsequently a dramatic increase in capital and operating costs of the production plant. Mesh weaves are currently used to reject sand during production and mitigate these effects. The proposed research project will investigate the flow, and solid retention capacity of different mesh weaves in various test cells.

Building Data-Driven Permanent Real-Time Full Wellbore Flow Monitoring Using Hybrid Distributed Fibre-Optic Simultaneous Vibration and Temperature Sensing Technology

In this project, we develop a framework to use the data from fiber sensing technologies to smart monitoring of Oil and Gas Reservoirs. The project involves extensive lab experiments simulating different monitoring conditions. Different configurations for installation of sensing equipment will be examined. The optimum location of tubing will be also determined. Signal processing methods will be used to extract useful information from the raw fiber-sensed data. Through experiments, we will record and analyze the relationship of fiber-sensed signals and the flow conditions.

Digital Oilfield – An Integrated Approach

Along with the development of Industry 4.0, the Oil and Gas Industry has employed Digital Twins as new way to lower cost, monitor assets, optimize maintenance, and minimize downtime by creating the connection between the physical world and the digital world. The digital oilfield collect enormous amounts of data from sensors, measuring devices, and other sources. The quantity of data is updated frequently and grows dramatically over time. This data must be stored, managed, and analyzed.

A Regular Solution Based Model for Evaluating Asphaltene Stability of Upgraded Heavy Oils

Most of the heavy oil and bitumen produced in Western Canada is transported through pipelines to refineries in North America. Prior to transportation, the high viscosity of those fluids must be reduced by either dilution with a light solvent or upgrading. The high costs associated with handling diluents has increased the interest in upgrading; that is, the thermal conversion of high viscosity heavy oil or bitumen into a less viscous product.

Study of unplugging sand control devices using shock waves

This research aims at better understanding the performance of Wireline Applied Stimulation Pulse (WASP) technique in formation damage reduction in oil and gas wells. Hydrocarbon production rate decreases as a result of plugging the sand control devices located in the wellbore region. Shock waves generated by the WASP technique help breaking the sources of formation damage into smaller pieces; As a result, small particles can be carried to the surface.

Sequence Stratigraphic Architecture of the Grand Rapids Formation and Equivalents, East-Central Alberta and West-Central Saskatchewan, Canada

Understanding of Earth history involves many approaches. In the case of this project, the focus is understanding the distribution (paleogeography) of ancient shallow-marine and coastal environments of Alberta and Saskatchewan during the Lower Cretaceous. The Grand Rapids Fm represents an important interval that occupies a crucial location for resolving the history of such environments, particularly those relevant to the oil sands-bearing McMurray Fm and the heavy oil-bearing Lloydminster area units.

CCREST: Cold Cracking by Resonance Energy for Sustainable Technologies

The project is a demonstration of Advanced Energy Technologies (AET)’s patented refining process for upgrading heavy oil products without diluent or extreme heat treatments. This produces lighter, higher value oil that is easier to work with throughout the process stream, with greater efficiency and less cost. AET will be conducting demonstration runs of the Hydrogen Activator Technology (HAT) on Albertan feedstock, partnering with local oil companies to secure heavy oils, bitumen and refinery residues.

Pipeline Strain Demand and Capacity under Geotechnical Threats

Pipelines are often subjected to longitudinal stresses due to ground movements such as moving slopes and discontinuous permafrost areas. In these cases, numerical models are used to calculate strain demand which is then compared to tensile and compressive strain capacities (TSC and CSC) which are functions of the pipeline and girth weld material properties. In terms of strain demand, we have shown that current numerical models are inappropriate as they neglect the Bourdon effect–the tendency of pressurized pipes to straighten–at the location of bends and elbows.

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