InterGenNS [Intergenerational North Shore] Project: An Inclusive Vision for Facilitating and Sustaining Intergenerational Community Building Strategies

In response to the vast amount of interest in the North Shore pertaining to intergenerational initiatives, this project seeks to bridge community agencies academic research to provide tangible tools and resources to broaden the awareness of activities connecting different generations in the North Shore to actively contribute to reducing social isolation and loneliness, while enhancing social capital, community capacity, cultural connectedness, social awareness, and social cohesion among various populations in the North Shore community.

People, Places, Policies and Prospects: Affordable Rental Housing for Those in Greatest Need

This research project examines affordable housing options and experiences of those in greatest need. The regional Ottawa team is part of a national collaboration of researchers, practitioners, and community partners forming the “housing for those in greatest need” node of the CMHC-SSHRC Collaborative Housing Research Network of the National Housing Strategy. The national project examines various sub-populations of marginalized groups of people in different regions in Canada.

Documenting Indigenous Ecological Knowledge to examine Atikameg (lake whitefish) and Namegosag (lake trout) interactions in Saukiing Anishinaabekiing

“Etuaptmumk (Two-Eyed Seeing)” is a framework for bringing together different worldviews in search of mutual benefit. In partnership with the Saugeen Ojibway Nation (SON), this project is using an Etuaptmumk (Two-Eyed Seeing) approach to bridge Indigenous Ecological Knowledge (IEK) and Western science to inform locally relevant fisheries governance on Lake Huron. Using both knowledge systems, this project will examine the problem of declines in lake whitefish, how interactions with lake trout affect the collapse, and report on community-led solutions.

A Community Needs Assessment of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder in Newfoundland and Labrador

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a lifelong disorder caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol that impairs cognitive, behavioural, social, and emotional development. It is the leading preventable developmental disability in Canada, impacting an estimated four percent of the general population, with higher rates among certain vulnerable groups. Newfoundland and Labrador has the highest rates of heavy drinking in Canada, which elevates the concern associated with this issue and the need for research into FASD in the province.

Assessing cumulative hydrological impacts from forest disturbance and climate change in Duteau Creek community watershed

There are growing concerns over the cumulative hydrological effects of forest disturbance on hydrology in the Duteau Creek community watershed. The objectives of this proposed study are: 1) to calibrate and validate the hydrological model SWAT; 2) to assess the cumulative hydrological effects of proposed forest harvesting under future climate change impacts; and 3) to evaluate possible hydrological impacts of spatial arrangements (or patterns) of forest disturbance or harvesting.

The Economic Transitions of Refugees Resettling in Rural Nova Scotia Since 2015: Learning from Refugee Newcomers, Sponsorship Groups, and Employers

The project explores the facilitators and barriers to the successful economic transitions of privately sponsored refugees resettled in rural areas of Nova Scotia since 2015. While acknowledging differences in pre-migration experiences, we seek to better understand 1) the post-migration factors shaping their economic transitions, such as gender, parental status, race, age and health; 2) how refugees’ transitions are informed by cultural, intercultural, economic, and social variables; and 3) how resettlement by private sponsors in rural settings influences refugees’ economic transitions.

Her Own Boss! Bridging Settlement and Economic Security for Visible Minority Newcomer Women in BC

HOB! is a community-based action research project with the aim of supporting visible minority newcomer women (VMNW) in starting entrepreneurial businesses. The research objectives of the project include identifying challenges and opportunities that VMNW face in the business environment of Canada. Moreover, this research will provide suggestions for improvement of employment and self-employment services for immigrant women.

Awechigewin: Developing a Virtual Approach to Community-Based Planning with Michipicoten First Nation

The proposed research project will use a combination of Participatory Action Research and Indigenous Research Methods to create an online engagement tool to gather Michipicoten First Nation (MFN) member’s perspectives on draft planning strategies and policies regarding six priority areas. Engagement is a challenge for MFN as a displaced and widely dispersed community, challenges which are heightened by the COVID-19 pandemic. Online engagement is an important tool for reaching Michipicoten citizens on- and off-reserve, particularly during the pandemic.

Co-developing a Bio-cultural Framework for Fish Habitat and Water Assessment with Lower Fraser First Nations

In partnership with the First Nations Fisheries Legacy Fund and their partner First Nations, Katzie, Kwantlen, Kwikwetlem, Musqueam, Tsleil-Waututh, and Tsawwassen, the proposed interns aim to develop a framework of aquatic health indicators that are identified and shaped by cultural values and priorities laid out by the involved First Nations in the Lower Fraser River Region.

Developing secure platforms for sharing First Nations owned information

The development and advancement of web mapping technologies is opening the doors to new mapping platforms that are accessible, interactive and engaging. In a conservation and resource co-management setting, there is a large potential for these web mapping platforms to be used to empower local communities by supporting local monitoring, planning and management decisions. However, there remains a disconnect between these technological advances and their capacity to address community needs and promote meaningful co-management.

Pages