Biotechnology partnership transforms safety in blood donation processing

From there, new protocols for screening and handling blood products were enacted to prevent the spread of these diseases through blood donation programs.

Over 30 years later, infectious diseases such as Zika and West Nile virus pose new challenges for the safety of blood donation around the world; however, a partnership between a multidisciplinary team of researchers at Université Laval, Quebec-based Phytronix, and international biotechnology firm Waters Corporation could revolutionize screening technology for donated blood products.

Big data takes a shot at crime in Saskatchewan

But now, a partnership between a team of researchers from the University of Regina’s Department of Computer Science and ISM Canada is creating new tools using “big data” that can help to tackle crime on the streets using information from the virtual world.

Seeking a big data solution

Driving fuel cell technology in cars of the future

With a demonstration fleet of B-Class F-Cell vehicles unveiled in 2010, Mercedes-Benz has established itself as a key competitor in this emerging market. The breakthrough came as a result of thousands of hours of research and development into fuel cell technology at Mercedes-Benz’s North American pilot manufacturing plant.

Beehive data creates buzz with farm-to-table technology

Determined to meet new standards for food traceability, head apiarist Allan Campbell sought a technology-based solution to improve record keeping and management of his entire beekeeping operation.

Allan turned to Bruce Hardy, CEO of Winnipeg software company Function Four, for his expertise in software-based records management.

Keeping an eye on climate change

Sina was beginning his program at the University of Northern BC’s Natural Resources and Environment Studies department when he was given the opportunity to apply his specialized knowledge of watershed management to an Accelerate project for lumber giant Canfor.

“We have a pulp mill in Prince George that draws water from the Nechako River,” says Mike Bradley, Director of Sustainability for Canfor Pulp. “That means the water level and its clarity are very important to us. We were concerned about how changes over time would affect our business.”

A gut reaction that’s creating opportunities

Thanks to a Mitacs Accelerate partnership with industry, researchers have discovered how a type of dietary fat can provide relief for this disease, and create business opportunities for the treatment of other conditions.

John Miklavcic was working on his PhD at the university’s Alberta Institute for Human Nutrition when he began an Accelerate internship with Biolipids Inc. The goal was to look into whether gangliosides — special kinds of dietary fat that help prevent infection and regulate the immune system — could be used to treat IBD.

Protecting children and teenagers from cyberbullying

Although their filtering system is able to find malicious chat messages with high accuracy, Two Hat Security was interested in applying machine learning algorithms to automatically detect negative content. To help solve their research challenge, they turned to a Mitacs Accelerate internship with University of Alberta Computer Science PhD candidate Ken Dwyer.

Calgary medical start-up taps into research talent through Mitacs

Despite this, many patients who have problems with the quality of their sleep do not seek medical diagnosis, and when they do, diagnosis and initiating treatment can be an arduous process that is disruptive, uncomfortable, and inconvenient.

Preventing outbreaks of foodborne illness before they spread

Investigators determined that the source was contaminated vegetables from a popular Mexican fast-food restaurant chain. Although the outbreak had no fatalities, E. coli contamination poses a potentially deadly health risk and costs the North American food industry billions of dollars every year.

A simple solution in a single line

Robotic arm to aid with mental health treatment

TMS treatment involves the placement of a magnetic coil near a patient’s head. The coil produces magnetic pulses that induce currents in the patient’s brain. TMS is approved for mental health treatment in Canada and has had promising results treating illnesses such as depression and schizophrenia.

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