Research into remote sensors inspires interns to start their own company

Alberta-based BMI Technologies manufactures onboard sensor systems which track the usage of forklifts.  But the company wanted to improve the technology to allow for automatic data analysis across a large fleet of vehicles, with uplink to a central computer system.

BMI was without an in-house research or engineering department, but learned of the Mitacs Accelerate program from CEO Arvind Gupta during a chance meeting at a social event in Vancouver.

Award Winner Interview: Cindy Chamberland

Can you tell us a bit about the research you did through Mitacs Accelerate that led to you winning the Mitacs Award for Outstanding Innovation – Post Doctoral?

Award Winner Interview: Andre Bezanson

Can you tell us a bit about the research you did through Mitacs Accelerate that led to you winning the Mitacs Award for Outstanding Innovation – PhD award?

Award Winner Interview: Adam Metherel

Can you tell us a bit about the research you did through Mitacs Elevate that led to you winning the Mitacs & NRC-IRAP Award for Commercialization?

Mitacs-Accelerate funds over $900,000 in research into cloud computing

The professor at the University of Toronto’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is bringing together research students from nine universities as part of the Smart Applications on Virtual Infrastructure (SAVI) Network. 

SAVI was set up to examine the future of cloud computing and software-defined networking, and Mitacs-Accelerate is helping to make the huge collaboration possible.  By using Accelerate clusters, multiple students are being matched with 20 company partners for a total of 50 internships over two years.

Pushing the boundaries of digital media technology

AWE Company is currently using the technology to take tourists back in time to the Canadian historical site of Fort York, the birthplace of Toronto’s urban center, which served as the city’s primary defense from the mid 1700s to late 1800s.

The Time Tablet™ utilizes a camera to blend virtual objects with real environments providing users with the unique experience of being virtually transported to Fort York in its prime.

Clearer eyes in the sky

They can be maneuvered around refinery stacks or high voltage power lines for inspections without risk to pilots, and survey crops or mining operations using a fraction of the fuel needed for a normal airplane or helicopter.

But for a UAV to be effective, it must be able to capture high quality photos and video while being controlled remotely.

Using technology to fight disease

Bojan Ramadanovic, a postdoctoral fellow at the Interdisciplinary Research in the Mathematical and Computational Sciences (IRMACS) Centre at Simon Fraser University, specializes in mathematical modeling of complex social systems, including the spread of disease and delivery of healthcare. Through Mitacs-Accelerate and working under his academic supervisor, Dr. Alexander Rutherford, he partnered with pharmaceuticals company Merck Canada Inc.

Natural healing with Kisameet clay

Found in the glacial deposit at Kisameet Bay on the British Columbia coast, the clay, now trademarked as “Kisolite”, is naturally antimicrobial.

Kisameet Glacial Clay Inc. has exclusive rights to harvest the clay for commercial use.  But the company needed solid scientific evidence of its medicinal properties prior to going to market.

Measuring the health of our oceans

Because of this, scientists are always looking for new technologies to help them monitor ocean water quality and changes in pollution levels.  One way to determine water quality is by analyzing the distribution of light through the water, also known as ocean radiance.  It is this light that provides the basic energy for photosynthesis which supports aquatic life.

However, an accurate measurement of ocean radiance is difficult to achieve.

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