The Discovery of Potential New Antidepressant Compounds from Mushrooms Native to British Columbia

Mental illnesses, particularly depression, is one of the leading causes of global disease burden. In addition to reducing the quality of life of patients and their relatives, it costs billions of dollars annually to the Canadian economy. Unfortunately, current antidepressant drugs are barely satisfactory and have numerous side-effects. The goal of this project is to discover potential new antidepressant drugs from wild mushrooms native to British Columbia.

Seasonal Change in Roosting Ecology in the Silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans)

Silver-haired bats are common species of bat found in North America. They use cavities in trees and space under loose bark to roost, or rest and raise young. The silver-haired bat is thought to migrate south over the winter. Despite this, we have found them in parts of British Columbia during the winter, suggesting they may not migrate in these areas. Our work will help support a MSc student who will investigate how silver-haired bats are using trees in areas where they overwinter in British Columbia and compare with how they use trees in the summer.

Assessment of soil quality and mycorrihzal communities and their relationship to the recovery of forest plant communities after wildfire in interior British Columbia

In collaboration with the Nadleh Whut’en and Stellat'en First Nations and SERNbc, researchers from the University of Northern British Columbia will look at the effects of wildfire on soil quality and mycorrhizal fungi abundance. Soil quality will be evaluated on the ability to promote plant growth by assessing available nutrients, soil texture and other physical properties. Fungal diversity will be evaluated in both the soil and the roots of established species. These ecosystem elements will be compared among low, moderate, and high severity burns, along with unburned areas.

Arsenic in soil removal and beneficial reuse

The objective of the research is to develop a method for and pilot test the remediation of 3,000 tonnes of arsenic trioxide contaminated soils with concentrations up to 20,000mg/kg. Our project aims to research and develop an efficient and safe methodology of soil washing to remove the arsenic from soil, however other methods would be considered. Moreover, we would also like to find a way to treat the arsenic solution resulted from a successful soil washing. One of the possible way to reuse the arsenic solution is to convert it to gallium arsenide for the use in solar power production.

To Discover Potential New Antidepressant Compounds from Mushrooms Native to British Columbia

Mental illnesses, particularly depression, is one of the leading causes of global disease burden. In addition to reducing the quality of life of patients and their relatives, it costs billions of dollars annually to the Canadian economy. Unfortunately, current antidepressant drugs are barely satisfactory and have numerous side-effects. The goal of this project is to discover potential new antidepressant drugs from wild mushrooms native to British Columbia.

The Effects of Release Size, Location and Timing on Chinook Salmon on the West Coast of Vancouver Island

Throughout Western North America with few exceptions all species of Pacific Salmon stocks have been in steady decline for over 50 years. On the West Coast of Vancouver Island, Chinook salmon stocks are of particular concern. These fish provide ecological, cultural and economic value to the region and current numbers are at an all-time low.

Eco-Friendly Styrofoam Substitute for Sustainable Food Packaging

Food packaging, particularly packaging for fish, relies heavily on the use of Styrofoam (i.e. expanded polystyrene or EPS). The world’s concern for environmental sustainability has prompted a need for eco-friendly alternatives and has led governments to enact single use plastics bans in many areas, such as Montreal and New York.

Moisture accumulation in a cavity-insulated thick-wall assembly with an exterior air barrier system as a result of natural convection in cold climates

The intent of the proposed research project is to measure the performance of a highly-insulated wall assembly system when an exterior air barrier system is used and air movement within and across the wall occurs. In cold climates, the movement of warm, moist air within and across an exterior wall may result in moisture accumulating on some of the surfaces within the wall if the conditions allow, causing long-term damage if it does not dry out.

Modeling the climatic impact of lakes in Tsay Keh Dene Nation and Carcross /Tagish First Nation territories of northwestern Canada

Lakes and reservoirs affect regional weather but their influence on the average environmental conditions in the remote, sparsely monitored, northwest of Canada has seldom been investigated. This study examines the climatic influences of lakes and reservoir impoundment on two First Nations territories in southern Yukon and northern British Columbia, using an atmospheric model alongside a lake model. Two 10-year meteorological simulations, corresponding to pre- and post-impoundment conditions, and for landscape with and without the lakes, respectively, will be used.

White Sturgeon Movement and Habitat Use in the Lower Columbia River

The White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population in the lower Columbia River was listed as endangered under the Species at Risk Act in 2006. Natural recruitment failure has occurred since the 1970s, with regular spawning occurring but insufficient numbers of viable offspring reaching juvenile stage to sustain the population. A recovery strategy has included the establishment of a successful hatchery to supplement the population while research into recruitment failure and collection of baseline biological data continues.

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