Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of a natural product aqueous extract

This project intends to test the antimicrobial potential of a GRAS status, natural product extracts. Using different varieties of our natural product we will test our own extraction procedure (currently not in use industrially) against different types of bacteria and fungi to see if they can be used as an antimicrobial treatment. This antimicrobial treatment has great potential for both human health application as well as agriculture, with emphasis on grapes. The research aims to find the active ingredients in extracts that show promise to adapt for future antimicrobial research.

Mobile energy efficient tissue culture laboratory for northern agriculture development and crop improvements

Food production and agriculture in Canada’s far North is met with many challenges. Short growing seasons, poor soil, extreme weather all impact the ability to effectively and efficiently produce food locally. In addition, Northern communities are at the end of a South to North supply chain, suspectable to multiple disruptions, both physical and economic. Our mobile lab allows for exponential plant cloning through sustainable processes.

Determining spatial and temporal overlap of migratory fishes with areas proposed for in-stream tidal turbine development to inform the tidal power Risk Assessment Program

The lack of scientific data on the potential effects of instream tidal power extraction on migratory fishes is delaying the decision-making process on a technology that shows promise for reducing carbon emissions, and for which Canada could become a global leader in the production of infrastructure. It remains unclear if fishes that occupy Canada’s leading tidal energy test site (Fundy Ocean Research Centre for Energy [FORCE], in Minas Passage, Nova Scotia) will be negatively affected by turbine installations.

Improving glycerol utilization in E.coli for heme biosynthesis

Heme is a naturally occurring molecule found in our blood and as well as in animals, responsible for carrying oxygen throughout our body. Interestingly, heme has been commercially used in various products such as in cosmetics, nutraceuticals, and food. The traditional production of heme however often involves animal slaughter and harsh chemical processing, which is costly and ultimately limits other potential applications. The proposed project will investigate a different method of producing heme by fermenting microorganisms; much in the same way that beer, wine, and insulin are made.

Accelerated Maturation of Rye Spirits

Whisky is made by a process of fermentation, distillation, and maturation. The last step is by far the most time-consuming part of this process. In order for maturation to occur, the distilled spirit must sit in a wooden barrel for years, during which the spirit takes on the familiar colour and taste of whisky. This inefficient process is an antiquated approach to creating this beloved class of beverage.

The Effects of Release Size, Location and Timing on Chinook Salmon on the West Coast of Vancouver Island

Throughout Western North America with few exceptions all species of Pacific Salmon stocks have been in steady decline for over 50 years. On the West Coast of Vancouver Island, Chinook salmon stocks are of particular concern. These fish provide ecological, cultural and economic value to the region and current numbers are at an all-time low.

Mapping anthropogenic noise in Alberta using passive acoustic monitoring data

Noise from human activities negatively affects the well-being of humans and wildlife alike. In rural areas, ecosystems that are relatively undisturbed by human activities may still be subjected to noise exposure from vehicles passing nearby, industry-related noise (e.g., compressor stations), or from airplanes overhead. To date, however, little work has been done to quantify what proportion of Canada’s land area might be exposed to anthropogenic noise, and how much noise is out there.

Post-breeding movement and survival of adult and first-year Bank Swallows in the Great Lakes ecoregion

The bank swallow is a species of insectivorous songbird considered to be threatened in Canada and has been prioritized for conservation action. All swallow species in Canada are migratory, and in their annual cycle, the post-breeding to first migration period is considered to be a difficult and dangerous time for juvenile birds. We propose to conduct an ecological study of bank swallow post-breeding movements and survival in southern Ontario.

Atlantic Salmon Smolt and Habitat Assessment in the Medway River

Atlantic salmon is in decline in many places across its range. Reduced habitat quality, declines in at-sea survival, and decreases in availability or timing of food resources are all recognized as factors contributing to spawning declines and early life survival. Healthy rivers are good candidates for adult enhancement programs. Adult enhancement involves removing some smolts from the river, growing them to adults in aquaculture tanks, and returning them to the river to supplement the natural returns from sea.

Connecting ecological dots: striped bass diets, DNA barcoding, stable isotopes and contaminants – Part 2 (of IT15410)

Striped bass, Morone saxatilis, is a popular anadromous fish caught along the Eastern Coast of North American. Striped bass invaded Labrador, NL in August 2017 and, during Part 1 of this study, were identified to feed on Atlantic salmon, cod, char and capelin; important fishes to NunatuKavut Community Council (NCC). The traditional method to identify stomach contents consists of examining stomach contents and morphologically identifying the species consumed.

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