Investigating the benefits of natural habitats and farmland heterogeneity for the diversity and abundance of insect pollinators in southern Ontario

To address the increasingly important problem of global insect pollinator declines, this project will investigate the relationship between three different natural habitat types (hedgerow, forest patch and restored prairie grass) and their impacts on wild pollinator biodiversity in Canada. This will be studied through the use of Malaise traps place on agricultural land adjacent to these key habitats to monitor for changes in abundance and diversity of native pollinators.

Understanding Coastal Ecosystem Response to Nature-Based Climate Adaptation Methods in a Cold Climate

The maritime provinces are currently facing questions around how to create more resilient coastal communities in the face of a changing climate, specifically due to impacts of sea level rise and increasing severity and frequency of storm events. One option for adapting to climate change is to move away from hard infrastructure towards softer/greener approaches, such as nature-base adaptation solutions, also known as “building with nature”.

Modeling the climatic impact of lakes in Tsay Keh Dene Nation and Carcross /Tagish First Nation territories of northwestern Canada

Lakes and reservoirs affect regional weather but their influence on the average environmental conditions in the remote, sparsely monitored, northwest of Canada has seldom been investigated. This study examines the climatic influences of lakes and reservoir impoundment on two First Nations territories in southern Yukon and northern British Columbia, using an atmospheric model alongside a lake model. Two 10-year meteorological simulations, corresponding to pre- and post-impoundment conditions, and for landscape with and without the lakes, respectively, will be used.

CASI Platform, Environment pillar: Benchmarking the environmental and climate performance of Canadian Agriculture

By 2050, agri-food systems must produce enough to feed 9 to billion people, while reversing trends of environmental degradation caused in part by agriculture production. This is no small task, and underscores why countless sustainable agriculture standards, certifications, initiatives and platforms have emerged to encourage and measure the impacts of sustainable agriculture practices.

Root associated microbiome of trees growing in a fractured bedrock toluene phytoremediation site - Year two

Phytoremediation is a promising in-situ technology that uses plants and its associated microorganisms (particularly bacteria and fungi) to clean up contaminated soils. The efficacy of these processes however, requires an in-depth knowledge on the diversity of microbial communities closely interacting with plant roots. Several studies have demonstrated that plants growing in contaminated soils select for competent microorganisms able to degrade these contaminants.

Threats to urban-forest sustainability in Halifax Regional Municipality

Our research aims to provide reliable information to HRM’s urban forestry staff for decision-making to enhance the sustainability of the city’s tree population. One student will investigate the factors that contribute to poor health and mortality of new street trees, aiming to assist the urban forestry staff to alleviate these factors in future plantings.

Advancing TTC Ridership Analytics and Revenue Forecasting Tools for Improved Transit Planning

(TTC) for improved public transit planning and better transit service delivery. With the implementation of PRESTO Card, TTC now generates real-time data on how often and where transit riders interact with the TTC’s infrastructure and network. PRESTO Card data allows new ways to capture transit demand in real-time and makes it possible to deploy state-of-the-art data science and predictive analytics to develop ridership forecasts for varying time horizons. The ridership forecasts could then be used to generate forecasts for farebox revenue.

Rural Philanthropy: Mapping Patterns of Charitable Giving in Newfoundland and Labrador and Canada’s Atlantic Region

With ever-changing rural economies and landscapes, it is essential to identify alternative ways that charitable and non-profits organizations, as well as communities, can be adaptive and resilient to the changing circumstances they face.
In partnership with McConnell Foundation and IBEC, this project will examine the environmental philanthropic landscape in Newfoundland and Labrador and Atlantic Canada to better understand the challenges, barriers and potential of gaining charitable status to support environmentally focused charities and non-profits.

Accelerated Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage in Mine Tailings

Reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to limit the impacts of climate change requires implementation of CO2 reduction technologies across a wide variety of industries. This research project will develop carbon management and sequestration technologies for reducing CO2 emissions in the mining industry with a focus on diamond mines in Canada, South Africa and Botswana.

Assessment of freshwater mussel species at risk translocations due to river infrastructure works: A case study of Argyll Bridge and the Grand River

This project seeks to understand the impact of translocation on freshwater mussel communities due to river infrastructure works in the Grand River, Ontario, Canada. We will determine the recovery of mussel communities post-translocation, and place them into context with similar translocations from across the region. The work will involve new empirical data on mussel recovery from the initial relocation in 2020 to 3 years post-relocation.

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