The Centralization of Social Need: what has been the impact on the affected populations of the centralization of social services into Windsor’s downtown core?

This study will explore how the centralization of social services and those who use them impact the environment of Downtown Windsor. The goal of the project is to understand how the location of social services effects the movement of people who are using these services. Stakeholders, businesses, and residents will be surveyed in order to understand the perceived impact on these groups. The project will also use mapping in order to analyse the physical locations of the services, service users and other environmental factors which may have an impact on this movement.

Schools as Potential Sites of Prevention & Intervention for Youth Homelessness

Youth homelessness exists across Canada and schools represent one site of interaction with youth who are homeless or who are at risk of homelessness. Decreasing the number of homeless young Canadians means the implementation of innovative, youth-informed practices and policies within institutions, services, and places throughout communities that serve as points of interaction with homeless and at-risk youth (such as schools).

Development of an Educational Resource to Assist Not for Profit Organizations in the Formulation and Implementation of Federal Disability Legislation

To ensure the largest impact possible, members of community disability organizations must be involved in the entire process of designing and implementing research. SCI Canada has spearheaded the development of CAIP and FALA, thereby achieving comprehensive input from disability organizations nationwide. Understanding the process of formulating and implementing legislation is a key element for creating important changes in the access and inclusion of Canadian society.

Eastside Works: Information System Support and Evaluation

EMBERS Eastside Works (EW) is a new low barrier employment centre in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver. EW helps people in the Downtown Eastside make connections to the world of work, earn income, and improve their livelihoods. The proposed research will work with EW to develop a database and information system that fits their needs, while informing a larger UBC research study on individual’s economic activity and how it affects their health and well-being in the downtown eastside.

Knowledge mobilization: Local community engagement, sustainability and adaptive governance

Knowledge mobilization is a complex process aimed at generating and disseminating information and expertise. It relates to decision-making in a complex and uncertain environment and requires the development of multiple networks to integrate different institutions and steer their resources. Managing such dynamic social-ecological networks can be addressed as a matter of adaptive governance which integrates the processes of generating multi-level social learning and preserving community heritage.

Local community engagement: White Butte Eco-museum Heritage Ecology Project

Ecomuseums are primarily community-based endeavors that respond to local needs while concentrating on sustainability. They help guide and develop democratic projects that focus on connections to local history and heritage, which include local physical geographic features, natural resources, natural habitats and agricultural practices. This research concentrates on creating an educational program to be delivered on a local conservation easement in southern Saskatchewan.

Researching and Evaluating SBL’s Youth Space Model, Summer Program, School Year and March Break Career Exploration Programs and Improving SBL’s Research-Evaluation Framework

This project takes a holistic and comprehensive analysis of all aspects of Success Beyond Limits (SBL’s) programming as well as their research and evaluation frameworks. Operating in a low-income and marginalized setting, youth that attend SBL’s programming find it difficult to find, secure and keep meaningful employment. This research will capture the experiences of those young people coming to SBL’s programs, identify the barriers they face with respect to employment and measure the impact of all of SBL’s programs.

An Assessment of Local Business’ Understandings and Needs for Community Leadership in a Small Urban Setting

Community leadership development and training programs must respond to changing corporate and public perceptions. There has been a lack of research on community leadership within small urban settings, where the impact that training and development programs have may be high. Our objective is to describe how local businesses in a small urban setting understand community leadership and what needs they have with respect to training and development. We will conduct fifteen in-depth interviews with a diverse range of local business leaders in Greater Victoria, British Columbia.

The Role of Material Security in Improving Health for People Who Use Drugs

It is well known that an adequate and stable income promotes health. Material security (e.g., housing, food, and service access) may operate distinctly from income security, yet may also be critically important to health. Nevertheless, material security and its relationship with employment is not well understood, an important oversight in research among people who use illicit drugs (PWUD) given that the ongoing need to acquire drugs may disrupt the translation of income security into material security.

Ecomuseums: Local community engagement, identity and governance.

Ecomuseums are primarily community-based endeavors that respond to local needs while concentrating on sustainability. They help guide and develop democratic projects that focus on connections to local history and heritage, which include local physical geographic features, natural resources, natural habitats and agricultural practices. This research concentrates on three case studies in southern Saskatchewan to study ecomuseum citizen participation and governance. Three unique ecomuseums are used as case studies.

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