Hey Neighbour! Evaluation and Understanding Social Connections and Engagement

The Hey Neighbour! pilot program evaluation intends to draw conclusions about the potential of social policy interventions into urban neighbourhoods. First, we will review the multidisciplinary research trends and approaches related to the question of improving social quality in urban neighbourhoods and communities. This will include review of the terminology, definitions of related terminology, overlapping usages across disciplines, co-citations, and different methodological approaches in the past generation, in the scholarly literature.

Activating Empty Storefronts Through Social Innovation

Vacant storefronts reflect the disinvestment and loss of retail activity that has accompanied suburbanization, while also creating impediments to revitalization. It is therefore important to consider alternative approaches, such as activating empty storefronts through social innovation. Social innovation focuses on public interest and social cohesion, rather than commercial success. In this research, we seek to develop a process for activating empty storefronts in Edmonton, in particular with arts-based activities.

Inclusionary Zoning as a Municipal Tool to Support Affordable Housing in Winnipeg

In 2011, 21% of Winnipeg residents (or 61,790 households) were living in unaffordable housing, as defined by Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC). Inclusionary Zoning (IZ) is a tool available to municipalities to respond to this issue by ensuring all new residential development includes a certain percentage affordable housing. Inclusionary Zoning is used successfully across the United States, Europe, and Australia to create affordable housing, but implemented differently by each city to respond to local need.

Long-Term Transportation Alternatives for Metrotown Redevelopment

Private car dependence represents a significant problem and a major obstacle towards a more sustainable future. A good combination of different modes of transportation can create an opportunity to overcome this issue. In this sense, integrating car sharing into Transit Oriented Development can be an ideal combination to promote a smart and sustainable development. This research will examine specific aspects of the relationship existing between car sharing and the public transit infrastructure.

Connections and Engagement Survey Analysis and Dissemination Project

The Connections and Engagement Survey Breakdown Project will provide a deeper understanding of relevant community health issues in the Metro Vancouver area by studying various elements associated with civic engagement and citizen participation. Using data collected by the Vancouver Foundation, this project will produce several reports on key issues of neighbourhood and community well-being and engagement and several reports pertaining to the engagement profiles of various cities in the region.

NRTEE 15 year update study: A comprehensive review of progress implementing the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy’s 2003 National Brownfield Redevelopment Strategy for Canada

After the NRTEE 2003 National Redevelopment Strategy for Canada, an in-depth review of the progress and status of the 14 recommendations offered will be completed through interviews of Canadian municipal and provincial governments and other stakeholders in the Brownfield Industry. Outcomes and recommendations will be formulated for consideration. This study will be presented at the CBN conference in June 2018 and the report will be made available to all participants and stakeholders through the CBN website and electronic avenues.

Designing multi-family housing to boost social capital and psychological well-being

There is no more powerful correlate of human health and wellbeing than positive social relationships. Multi-family housing, through design, layout, and location, can exert a significant effect on local relationships, neighborhood trust and residents’ sense of belonging. We propose a program to gather, refine and illustrate the evidence linking design and social wellbeing in multi-family housing.

Scaling Geocontextualization

Urban design and development is an iterative process that involves community engagement and multiple feedback cycles. Advances in internet technologies and web mapping technologies has made it possible to display design plans on websites and to collect feedback on specific locations or aspects of the provided design. Using web mapping applications to feedback from the community is formally known as facilitated volunteer geographic information (FVGI).

Embedding a Climate Change videogame in High Schools: Towards a Teacher's Guide for Engaging Students with a Place-based Videogame – Future Delta 2.0

At the moment, BC has no comprehensive climate change curriculum in high schools, and educators lack coordinated materials to support its teaching. In an effort to narrow this gap, the Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning (CALP) at the Faculty of Forestry, UBC partnered with the Delta School District, to develop an educational and compelling videogame – Future Delta 2.0 (FD2), which brings together methods from commercial gaming a participatory research to address climate change science in an innovative place-based game environment.

Sustainable Urban Development: Homebuyer Expectations and Implementation Challenges

The main objective of this research project is to synthesize and evaluate the published and grey literatures on consumer perceptions of green real estate development and sustainable community design features. Current research on homebuyers perceptions, priorities, motivations, and willingness-to-pay has yet to be consolidated. The complex nature of these topics scatters research across several disciplinary sectors, making it difficult to integrate the data and make an informed decision for sustainable real estate investment.

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