USask students harvest experience for Farm At Hand mobile app

Agriculture and farming in the 21st century is an increasingly complex operation that requires sound organization and planning, from seed inventories to tractor parts and harvest planning, among other tasks for the farmer. Farm At Hand, a start-up mobile application company, was built to help farmers address the complex needs of their operations “from seed to sale.”

Optimizing software security

Yaser was a PhD candidate under the supervision of Drs. Amir Hossein Banihashemi and Ioannis Lambadaris at Carleton University, and a Mitacs Accelerate intern who undertook a research project on HTML5 security problems and possible solutions. He was introduced to Irdeto Canada by Justin Moores, Director, Business Development at Mitacs, while pursuing his graduate studies in Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carleton University where he also worked as a Mitacs Globalink student advisor.

Algorithms for public health

“Through this research internship, I have learned a lot about the various applications and software used for mapping virus genes,” Ye explains.

Alongside Dr. Stephane Aris-Brosou, from the University of Ottawa’s Department of Biology, Ye is creating a novel algorithm to analyze the evolution and transmission network of the virus.

New waves of communication

Alongside Dr. Frank Rudzicz of University of Toronto’s Department of Computer Science, Soumendu is constructing software that will improve the quality of life of individuals with speech disorders.

Using electroencephalography (EEG) signals from patients, Soumendu is collecting data from linguistic centers of the brain and areas involved in motor planning. This data will contribute to the development of tools that will allow patients to communicate via EEG signals by the use of an artificial articulator.

Radiating a love for Canada

Shouvik is researching Terahertz electromagnetic waves (T waves), which are unique in their ability to make visually opaque objects transparent. T-wave imaging provides remarkable opportunities for applications in non-destructive testing and imaging, medical diagnosis, health monitoring, and chemical and biological identification.

A step forward in computer security

Marcelo is currently working on a project where he analyzes short online documents, such as emails, to check the identity of the author. His research is integral to the field of computer security because there have only been a handful of studies on this topic.  “Authorship verification of online documents can play a critical role in various criminal cases such as blackmailing and terrorist activities, says Marcelo.” “Sharing my research with others is integral to the field of computer security, and Mitacs Step has provided me with the necessary communication skills to do so.”

Mitacs Accelerate Professor Profile – Dr. Stephen Chen, York University

After completing his PhD in Robotics at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, he worked at IBM before moving to York University to take up a position at the School of Information Technology in 2001 where he is now an Associate Professor.

Dr. Chen has supervised three post-doctoral fellows through Mitacs-Accelerate internships, each lasting for at least 12 months, and is in the process of applying for two more.  He credits Mitacs for helping him secure more funding for his diverse research goals.

Mitacs-Accelerate Professor Profile: Dr. Jon Rokne – University of Calgary

Originally from Norway, he moved to Canada 1964 and completed a Masters of Science and a PhD in Mathematics at the University of Calgary, before joining the Department of Computer Science at the university as a professor.

Globalink Professor Profile: Dr. Christian Desrosiers of École de Technologie Supérieure

Each student brings different experiences and perspectives to their individual projects, playing a key role in Dr. Desrosiers research. His lab’s first Mitacs Globalink student, Indian student Kuldeep Kumar began a project in the summer of 2011 using machine learning to extract data from social networks in order to analyze their growth and evolution. In 2012, Globalink student Qiquan Shi from China continued, and advanced that same research.

Mitacs-Accelerate interns help navigate the way to revolutionary positioning software

But GPS has one major drawback which limits its use – it doesn’t work accurately indoors.  Because it relies on signals from satellites, accuracy is also compromised when trying to navigate between tall buildings in urban areas, or under dense foliage.

Calgary-based Trusted Positioning Inc. set out to change this by developing software that would allow for accurate and continuous positioning of a device in any location, be it inside, underground, or in the heart of a dense urban city.

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