Discovery holds new promise for children with inflammatory bowel disease

Although those figures sound alarming, researchers at the University of British Columbia (UBC) are one step closer to understanding — and treating —pediatric diseases such as colitis, Crohn’s disease, and others under the IBD umbrella.

Under the supervision of Dr. Laura Sly of UBC’s Department of Pediatrics, Eyler Ngoh, a PhD student, wanted to build on his previous research on the impact of an enzyme called SHIP. His initial work indicated that patients with low levels of SHIP experienced increased inflammation, a symptom common in IBD.

Saskatchewan to battle absenteeism rates by linking health & wellness to productivity

Professor Lorna Butler and her team at the University of Saskatchewan’s College of Nursing and the International Centre for Northern Governance and Development aim to address this issue through a research partnership with the International Mineral Innovation Institute (IMII) and Mitacs’ Accelerate program.

Biotechnology partnership transforms safety in blood donation processing

From there, new protocols for screening and handling blood products were enacted to prevent the spread of these diseases through blood donation programs.

Over 30 years later, infectious diseases such as Zika and West Nile virus pose new challenges for the safety of blood donation around the world; however, a partnership between a multidisciplinary team of researchers at Université Laval, Quebec-based Phytronix, and international biotechnology firm Waters Corporation could revolutionize screening technology for donated blood products.

Researchers attack spruce budworm using chemistry

A recent outbreak of spruce budworm infestation in Quebec contributed to millions of dollars in lost revenue potential for Canada’s lumber industry and threatened forests in northern New Brunswick. This prompted researchers at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) and Carleton University to partner in the development of solutions to ward off the forest pest.

Research into Quebec’s rivers aims to improve Atlantic salmon habitats

This summer, Globalink intern Piyush Rai is working alongside Dr. Normand Bergeron at Université INRS to better understand how improved culvert design can positively impact the migration and survival of Atlantic salmon.

Food safety gets a boost thanks to development of allergen detectors

With no surefire method of detection, people with serious food allergies must avoid certain foods altogether; however, a project at the University of Guelph is increasing food safety by helping to detect allergens well before an item ends up on consumers’ plates.

Giving families the tools to care for children affected by Zika

Thousands of kilometers away in Halifax, Canada, Mitacs Globalink intern Lisandra Oliviera is working with a team of researchers at the IWK Health Centre to conduct a systematic review of intervention therapies for parents of children with disabilities similar to microcephaly – a family of conditions known as neurodevelopmental disorders. The parenting intervention includes an “orientation” for family members to develop their parenting skills in ways that will help with management of symptoms and improved mental health for the children.

A gut reaction that’s creating opportunities

Thanks to a Mitacs Accelerate partnership with industry, researchers have discovered how a type of dietary fat can provide relief for this disease, and create business opportunities for the treatment of other conditions.

John Miklavcic was working on his PhD at the university’s Alberta Institute for Human Nutrition when he began an Accelerate internship with Biolipids Inc. The goal was to look into whether gangliosides — special kinds of dietary fat that help prevent infection and regulate the immune system — could be used to treat IBD.

Gaining skills for the present, making connections for the future

But UBC PhD student Samuel Antoine says this is exactly the kind of big-picture thinking that academics need to succeed. Thanks to Mitacs Step, Sam has been able to access a wide range of similar courses that will help his career.

It started when Sam was talking with his academic supervisor in UBC’s School of Population and Public Health about opportunities to continue his research.

Postcard from China: McGill student takes her research to the Tibetan plateau

Almost half the world’s population cooks with highly polluting, traditional biomass stoves that burn wood or crop residue. The resulting household air pollution is one of the world’s leading causes of death and contributes significantly to climate change.

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