Municipal Climate Change Planning Guidance

The objectives of this research project revolve around the emerging world of municipal climate change policy, planning and implementation in an Ontario context. Specifically, this project will:
1. Assess and compare innovative policies and procedures that are being used by Ontario municipalities to integrate growth planning with climate and energy planning.
2. Assess the factors that support and define net zero community building in Ontario.
3.

Integrated hydrodynamic and water quality modelling tool for the Toronto Waterfront - Year Two

The goal of this project is to develop the first ever high definition integrated water circulation and water quality model for the Toronto Waterfront. As one of the most urbanized freshwater ecosystems with complex geometries and physical processes, Toronto Waterfront is in an urgent need for modern scientific tools that can support effective environmental management strategies and inform design of costly new development and restoration projects that have considerable socioeconomic implications.

Review of Effectiveness of Investments in Renewable Energy for Social and Affordable Housing

This research will identify best practices for the design of renewable energy investment programs targeting the social housing sector. Involving mixed methods of research, including literature review, interjurisdictional scan, and strategic interviews with third party experts, the research will result in a set of actionable recommendations for provincial and federal governments, municipal social housing authorities, and other third party private sector actors involved in the renewable energy and social housing sectors.

Development of Combined Building Integrated Photovoltaic/Thermal (BIPV/T) System for Net-Zero Energy Building Applications

"Building integrated photovoltaic–thermal array (BIPV/T) incorporated within a building structure is a system that combines the roof/facade, photovoltaic cells and thermal collector as an all-in-one product instead of installing each individually. BIPV/T effectively replaces conventional building materials and is more cost-effective than having several separate products, and installation of the BIPV/T system can be implemented during initial building construction.

Integrated hydrodynamic and water quality modelling tool for the Toronto Waterfront

The goal of this project is to develop the first ever high definition integrated water circulation and water quality model for the Toronto Waterfront. As one of the most urbanized freshwater ecosystems with complex geometries and physical processes, Toronto Waterfront is in an urgent need for modern scientific tools that can support effective environmental management strategies and inform design of costly new development and restoration projects that have considerable socioeconomic implications.

Natural Heritage Risk and Vulnerability Assessment in the Region of Peel

This project involves better understanding how climate change might affect our natural environment with the Region of Peel located within the Greater Toronto Area. The approach is to consider how vulnerable components of the natural environment, such as streams, forests and the organisms living in these habitats, might be to a new climate or extreme weather. In addition to organisms like fish, wildlife and plants, humans also benefit greatly from nature when it is healthy and functional. Examples of these benefits include clean water and air, shaded streets and park lands, and recreation.

Evaluation of organic anti-icing agents for winter maintenance of transportation facility

Considering the facts that road salts pose significant environmental impacts and infrastructural damages, this research will evaluate the organic products for snow and ice control for transportation facilities. An extensive field tests will be conducted focusing snow melting performances of the organic liquids over regular bine over an expected ranges of weather and other external variables in a parking lot in the winter season.

Hybrid modeling framework for flood prediction

A hybrid computational framework for short-term flood prediction in urban watersheds (characterized by overland runoff) will be developed to improve prediction accuracy. The framework aims to accurately predict an event, e.g. flood or no-flood, as opposed to traditional methods which estimate water flow characteristics, e.g. 6 feet above flood stage. Successful early prediction of these events can help authorities to take appropriate mitigation measures and to minimize losses from the flooding.

Modelling Guidance for Low Impact Development Practices

To combat the degradation of receiving water resulting from stormwater runoff approaches that focus on retaining and infiltrating stormwater at the source, referred to as Low Impact Development (LID) practices, are being proposed more frequently in recent years. Toronto and Region Conservation Authority recently initiated monitoring of precipitation and runoff from a large industrial site, comprised of several buildings and extensive paved areas, in which several LID practices have been constructed: rainwater harvesting system, biofilters, vegetated swales and porous pavement.

Development of residential HVAC and air conditioning demand management and control systems

This project aims to leverage the TRCA Archetype Sustainable House facilities, the innovative HVAC, DHW and renewable energy equipment and on-site comprehensive monitoring system to identify opportunities for systems integration and optimization and, together with the manufacturing partner and utilities, demonstrate a control module that can both inform homeowners of their energy consumption via a user-friendly display and automate system operation of the on-site equipment.

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