Discovering an engaging international community via Globalink

When Zoey’s professor in China described Mitacs Globalink as an international research program that could transform her perception of the world forever, she immediately applied.  Becoming part of a global community was a lifelong dream for this passionate medicine student and she was thrilled when she received the offer to do cancer detection research with Dr. Tim Storr in the Department of Chemistry at Simon Fraser University.

Discovering “La vie en rose”

For Qiquan Shi, coming to Canada from a tiny village in Guizhou Province in China was the opportunity of a lifetime.  A 2011 Globalink student had told him about the program and he recognized it as his chance to explore the world, despite coming from an impoverished farming family.  Overcoming all obstacles, he achieved outstanding academic success at Wuhan University in China, which gained him the recognition he needed to be selected for the highly-competitive Globalink program.  It enabled him to come to Canada to do advanced research at l’École de technologie supérieure in Montreal.

Award Winner Interview: Sachin Goel

The research resulted in the creation of a strain of E-coli that can utilize sugars simultaneously to efficiently produce Biofuel.  Below is an exclusive interview with Mr. Goel, who won the Mitacs Undergraduate Award for Outstanding Research Achievement, as presented by the Honourable Ed Fast, Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway at the 2nd Annual Mitacs Awards Reception, held November 28th in Ottawa.

What is the greatest advantage you gained by participating in Mitacs Globalink?

Coming full-circle to Canada

After having come to Canada for a summer English language camp in 2010, Barbara Paes of Universidade de Brasília was always looking for opportunities to return to Canada. So when her friend told her about the Mitacs Globalink program one week before the application deadline, she hurried to apply before it was too late. Now studying at the University of British Columbia’s Brain Research Centre, Barbara has fallen in love with Canada all over again.

Bright minds bridging borders

Sreeta Gorripaty, Sisir Yalamanchili and Chaitali Joshi recently returned to India, having completed Mitacs Globalink internships in Canada, with a newfound enthusiasm for bridging the borders between India and Canada through research and education.  These high-achieving students are the future leaders of India, and therefore their connection to Canada through the Globalink program and the Minister’s visit has the potential to make a real difference for the relations between the two countries. 

A chance to excel in Canada

Together, the students and their professor developed a system to visualize the evolution of a software program from its first inception to the latest edition. The system provides useful information to software engineers and designers as they continually advance computer software packages to be faster and more user-friendly for new computer operating systems.

Taking the pulse of new life-saving Smartphone application

Vicky comes to Canada from the Beijing Institute of Technology in China, where she is working towards a Bachelor’s degree in Computing Science.  She chose to apply to the Globalink program over others because it engages students from different countries, which has allowed her to network globally during her exchange: “You can really feel the collision of cultures here through Globalink – I think that is really unique.”

A Canadian science adventure

The third-year electronics and communications engineering student from the Indian School of Mines will be contributing to more energy efficient heating and air conditioning systems in commercial buildings. The goal of this Mitacs Globalink project will be to implement a wireless sensor network of devices which will communicate with each other to monitor environment conditions such as temperature and pressure, turning on or going to sleep on-command.

Canada is his oyster

In collaboration with fellow Mitacs Globalink student Nayantara Duttachoudhury, he has developed a system to visualize the evolution of a software program from its first inception to the latest edition. It’s something like being able to see —in a simple, compact way— the changes of internal computer code from the first-ever edition of “Multi-tool Word” in 1983 to the current Microsoft Word 2010. This type of information is useful to software engineers and designers as they continually advance software to be faster and more user-friendly for new computer operating systems.

A dynamic and diverse experience of Canada

The civil engineering student completed a research project on simulations of barrier walls for bridges to calculate their load bearing capacity with Dr. Ehab Salakawy. Such simulations will help municipal civil engineers to design stronger, more long-lasting structures across Canada.

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