Blown away: Brazilian intern takes her research to Saskatchewan wind farms

Luanna’s in Canada as a Mitacs Globalink intern where she’s collaborating with Professor Wei Peng on a project to make wind power more efficient.

“Ever since I was a teenager, I’ve had a love for renewable energy,” says Luanna. “When I read about this project, I jumped at the chance to take part in it and further my knowledge.”

Disease diagnosis and prosthetic limbs to benefit from muscle research

Gabriel and Dr Kuruganti are using high-density electromyography (EMG) sensors to understand how the muscles in the upper and lower limbs behave under different conditions including exercise and rehabilitation. The information obtained from these sensors can help to understand human movement. Traditionally, EMG systems use up to 16 channels of data. Gabriel is helping to “tune” the high-density EMG signals in a 64-node sensor to give the highest quality information for other researchers to use.

Flooding simulation software to help Canadians keep their heads above water

One Tunisian student is focusing on the Spencer Creek watershed in Dundas, Ontario (near Hamilton), in the hopes of understanding — and preventing — floods in the area and across Canada. Houssem Hmaidi is an engineering undergraduate at the University of Medjez El Bab who is spending his summer at the University of Guelph through Mitacs’ Globalink program. Under the supervision of Dr. Andrew Binns, he’s working on a 2-D modelling project that simulates real and staged flooding events in the region, using software developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Research that tunes into emotions

Working under the direction of Professor Alexandre Lehmann, the Australian psychology major is using electroencephalography (EEG) to measure the brains of 20 volunteers to see how they react to different types of sounds. Karina demonstrates her research

International students explore U of S with Mitacs

After earning her undergraduate degree at Beijing China Agricultural University, Liu decided she wanted to explore a frostier environment for the next phase of her academic career.

“It’s kind of ridiculous, but I’d heard people saying it can turn to minus 30 or even 40 in the winter (in Saskatoon) and I really wished I could see those piles of snow,” Liu said, laughing.

“Research and innovation are important here”

Rui applied for the Mitacs’ Globalink Research Internship in the summer of 2014 —hoping to be accepted to the School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT) at SFU. He was accepted to the internship, which would be supervised by Associate Professor Carman Neustaedter, to study interactive computing and design.

Postcard from India: University of Waterloo student’s nanocomposite both detects and scavenges mercury in contaminated water

Under the guidance of Professor Michael K.C. Tam in the University of Waterloo’s Department of Chemical Engineering, I have been developing novel nanocomposites based on sustainable nanomaterials that can remove wastewater contaminants. Prof. Tam’s laboratory specializes in the design and development of novel functional materials based on eco-friendly nanomaterials and polymers.

Postcard from Brazil: water resource management in Porto Seguro

Reposted with permission from What WE Have to Say, Western University Engineering’s blog

Postcard from Brazil: applying data analytics to Brazilian soccer clubs

When I told my business mentor that I was looking for a unique opportunity that aligned well with my studies, he said, “Why don’t you go abroad then?” Before I could answer him, he told me about the Mitacs Globalink Research Award — it didn’t take long before I was infatuated with the idea.

Researchers attack spruce budworm using chemistry

A recent outbreak of spruce budworm infestation in Quebec contributed to millions of dollars in lost revenue potential for Canada’s lumber industry and threatened forests in northern New Brunswick. This prompted researchers at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) and Carleton University to partner in the development of solutions to ward off the forest pest.

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