César Maldonado Monter fuels a dream in Canada

Hailing from Mexico, where he studies Chemical Engineering at Tecnológico de Monterrey, César was introduced to Mitacs through a friend and former research intern. Upon seeing his friend’s photos and hearing stories of the research, he simply said, “I need to go to Canada!” With that, he applied and was accepted to do research in biofuel production in Quebec this summer.

Postcard from Turkey: University of Ottawa master’s student helps contain greenhouse gases

At the University of Ottawa’s Chemical and Biological Engineering department, I work with Dr. Tezel and Dr. Boguslaw Kruczek to investigate the potential for inorganic membranes to capture greenhouse gases. Although these membranes are well suited to large-scale applications, they are a few years away from industrial implementation.

Award Winner Interview: Liang Feng

Can you tell us a bit about the research you did through Mitacs Globalink that led to you winning the Mitacs Award for Outstanding Innovation – Undergraduate?

Fueling a greener tomorrow

Marina and Professor Hawboldt are researching an alternative energy source to petroleum that recycles typically discarded natural resources, including forestry residue from sawmills and pulp and paper plants, as well as fish oil from fish processing plants.

Marina is investigating extraction methods to create high-quality fuel from these resources, and this fuel can then be used for cars or as a means to treat waste water.

Finding solutions for wastewater treatment through Mitacs Globalink

It is this notion that drew Boyang to study Municipal and Environmental Engineering at China’s Harbin Institute of Technology.

After hearing about Mitacs from previous Globalink Research Interns and finding a project that paired perfectly with her academic background, Boyang could not resist the chance to come to Canada.

Under the guidance of Jesse Zhu, a professor at Western University’s Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Boyang is contributing to research on wastewater treatment technologies.

Mitacs Globalink student facilitates growth in Toronto communities

Mariana is working on a research project with Dr. Leila Farah from Ryerson University’s Department of Architectural Science. Her research project –The Inclusive City: Cultivating Toronto’s Social Fabric, One Garden at a Time – will see Mariana first researching neighbourhoods in Toronto to identify specific communities with crime-related issues, and then survey spaces where urban gardens could be incorporated. The next step will be to develop the design proposal, as well as a well-thought-out plan for implementation of the urban participatory gardens.

Measuring the health of our oceans

Because of this, scientists are always looking for new technologies to help them monitor ocean water quality and changes in pollution levels.  One way to determine water quality is by analyzing the distribution of light through the water, also known as ocean radiance.  It is this light that provides the basic energy for photosynthesis which supports aquatic life.

However, an accurate measurement of ocean radiance is difficult to achieve.

Postcard from Turkey: Ryerson PhD candidate harnesses the sunshine of Izmir for his research project

The application process went by quickly. After my project was approved, my host university, Dokuz Eylül University in Izmir, Turkey, kindly offered me a good room and daily breakfast in the university residence.

Stepped up networking skills

The networking workshop has helped boost his confidence in sharing his research outcomes.  “I am a social person naturally, but I lacked the formal training in how to act in a proper networking event.  Learning the little things, like carrying business cards, building a LinkedIn profile and simply how to approach a stranger and make small talk were all very beneficial, and the instructors were excellent.   Since I took the workshop, I have found that when I go to large events, I am better prepared to make meaningful connections with people in a natural way.”

Postcard from China: Western University student is establishing pest control strategies

At Western University, I work with Genomics in Agricultural Pest Management (GAP-M), an international consortium with researchers from Canada, Spain, Belgium, France, and the United States. GAP-M is focusing on the study of spider mite genomes to develop strategies to reduce crop damage and increase yields. By using comparative analysis of three spider mite species’ genomes and their feeding models, we hope to find new systems for pest control strategies.

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