Examining Human Standing Balance Response with Independent Ankle Control

Standing balance is controlled by several inputs, including vision, vestibular sense, and ankle proprioception
Research studies in this field actively engage and manipulate these input mechanisms to examine their
effects on the balance output, mainly muscle actuation in the lower limbs. While significant progress has
been made, it is often difficult to isolate a single input and test its results on the output. The unique Robot
for Interactive Sensor Engagement and Rehabilitation (RISER) has been developed in the UBC CARIS

Experimental Study of Fiber Interaction with a Cylinder Array

In papermaking, a slurry of wood fibres, which are approximately 2 millimetres long and 30 microns in diameter, is drained through a forming fabric. In this drainage process the fibres get trapped by the fabric as the water drains through it. The actual drainage process is obviously highly complicated because the forming fabric geometry is complex, the wood fibres may interact with one another, and the wood fibres have variable properties. However, we may gain some understanding of dewatering by considering simplified versions of the process.

Development of an electromechanical System for 3D Display Prototype

3D movies and videogames enjoy a rapidly increasing popularity. However, current display technology, especially for home theatres, still requires the viewers to wear assistive devices such as shutter glasses. We are developing 3D display technology that does not require such assistive devices. This technology uses micro-electromechanical elements and synchronized image content display.

Development of novel nanomaterial in advanced lithium batteries for electric vehicles

There is an increasing demand for development of electric vehicle (EV) due to the serious energy shortages and environmental pollution. Advanced Lithium (Li) rechargeable batteries are the most promising power systems in commercial Hybrid EV. The main challenge is still the development of alternative material in terms of energy density, cycability, safety, and cost. In this proposed research, novel nanostructed material and catalysts will be developed to achieve these objectives for EV applications. This would help to make lithium batteries competitive with internal combustion engine.

Integration of microwave technology to microfluidic systems for high throughput combinatorial tests and lab-on-a-chip applications

The high throughput combinatorial testing for pharmaceutical applications requires fast methods for manipulating droplets in microfluidic systems. In this project, a microwave platform will be designed and employed for fast droplet heating, identification and detection. The use of extremely confined microwave energy makes heating, detecting, and identifying droplets possible. With the new platform it will be possible to control the temperature of each droplet separately.

Development of MEMS auto-focusing mechanism for cell phone cameras

Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) refer to integrated mechanical & electrical systems in micron scale that are now growing in numbers due to a miniaturization trend. An advanced actuation method proposed for MEMS in University of Toronto and Ryerson University will be applied for an auto-focus mechanism in cell phone cameras. This research will build on work conducted by a six-member research team in both universities. The proposed MEMS autofocus not only has larger depth of focus, but also is faster than the current technologies, and is easier to implement.

Demonstration and Performance Evaluation of an Optimized Lab-scale Biogas-fuelled Heat and Electric Power Generation System Based on the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

The build of an efficient, low cost, and environmentally friendly heat and power generation system for the use in single family detached dwellings, wastewater treatment plants, or landfills, is the objective of this project. This system is based on the solid oxide fuel cell and is designed to operate with biogas. We have successfully proved the advantages of this system over the traditional and other fuel cell-based systems developed in the United States and Europe, through computer simulation.

Developing a prototype electrowetting on dielectric device to perform immunoassays

The goal of this project is to develop a prototype microfluidic device to rapidly determine whether a target protein is present in a sample. Applications of this device include genomic and proteomic research, pharmaceutical testing, and quality control for various industries, including food preparation. The prototype will make use of electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) actuation, which uses the application of electric fields to manipulate confined droplets. Unlike conventional microfluidic devices, EWOD devices do not require complex features for flow control or external pumping.

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